Advances that Could Change the Way You Manage Patients with Geographic Atrophy secondary to Age-related Macular Degeneration

Title Advances that Could Change the Way You Manage Patients with Geographic Atrophy secondary to Age-related Macular Degeneration
Author, Co-Author Mark Dunbar, Erin Henry, Mila Malhotra
Topic Treatment and Management of Posterior Sgmt Disease
Year
2016
Day
Thursday
Program Number
165159
Room
Ballroom A-B
Affiliation
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute
Abstract

Purpose: Optometrists are on the front lines for providing primary eye care for many patients with geographic atrophy (GA) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD).  Therefore it is critical that we are up to date with the latest developments in diagnosis, management, and potential therapies. The aim of this presentation is to review recent advances in methods for characterizing GA, progress in our understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology, and ultimately how potential new treatments will change the landscape for managing patients with GA.

Methods: Review of the PubMed literature for studies in patients with GA including current imaging modalities and assessments of retinal anatomy and visual function, and review of the clinicaltrials.gov database for ongoing registered trials of patients with GA.  

Results: There has been an explosion of new information surrounding our understanding of geographic atrophy, leading to better GA classification systems.  In addition, there are now several investigational drugs being studied for the treatment of GA in phase 2 and 3 clinical trials.  There have been advances in imaging methodology for evaluation of anatomic characteristics of GA, including fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography techniques. New methods for assessing visual function such as microperimetry, low luminance visual acuity, reading speed, and patient-reported outcome questionnaires may improve detection of functional deficits compared to standard best-corrected visual acuity exams. Finally the role of genetics has emerged as an important factor in both GA pathophysiology and potentially in response to therapeutic intervention.

Conclusion: The pace of GA research is increasing, with a number of advances in recent years related to disease characterization, imaging, and emerging therapeutic targets. The implications of these advances for our current best practices will be discussed.

Affiliation of Co-Authors Genentech, Inc, Genentech, Inc
Outline