BASELINE PATIENT-REPORTED FINDINGS FROM THE COLLABORATIVE LONGITUDINAL EVALUATION OF KERATOCONUS (CLEK) STUDY

Title BASELINE PATIENT-REPORTED FINDINGS FROM THE COLLABORATIVE LONGITUDINAL EVALUATION OF KERATOCONUS (CLEK) STUDY
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, Mae Gordon, Heidi Wagner, John Sterling, Julie Shin, Mary Jameson, Donald Everett, The Study Group
Topic
Year
1997
Day
Monday
Program Number
2:00 pm
Room
River Room
Affiliation
The Ohio State University College of Optometry
Abstract PURPOSE. The Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Keratoconus (CLEK) Study is a three-year observational study of keratoconus patients conducted at 15 Participating Clinics. Its specific aims are to characterize the progression of keratoconus, determine factors associated with keratoconus and with disease progression, and to measure quality of life in keratoconus patients.

METHODS. A total of 1,209 Study-eligible keratoconus patients were enrolled between May 31, 1995 and June 29, 1996. Eligible patients had to have an irregular cornea in at least one eye, a slit lamp sign of keratoconus in at least one eye, and could not have bilateral transplants or bilateral crystalline lens-related or posterior segment disease.

RESULTS. The CLEK Study patients are Caucasian (69%), African-American (20%), Hispanic (8%) and Asian (3.5%). One hundred nineteen patients entered the study with a unilateral corneal transplant. The majority of the CLEK Study patients are corrected with rigid contact lenses in both eyes (892 of 1,209 or 74%); of these, 571 of 892 or 64% also use glasses in some capacity. Of the 1,089 non-transplanted patients who responded to the eye rubbing question, 536 patients (49.2%) report rubbing both eyes vigorously, while only 20 patients (1.8%) report rubbing only one eye vigorously. Five hundred patients (45.9%) do not report eye rubbing in either eye. One hundred sixty-three (13.5%) of all patients report a family history of keratoconus in either a parent, sibling, child, aunt, or uncle. When surveyed for a positive history of Down syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, focal dermal hypoplasia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, infantile tapetoretinal degeneration, oculodentodigital syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and Rieger's anomaly, not a single patient reports having any of these diseases. Six hundred thirty-nine patients (53%) report having hay fever or allergies, 180 patients (15%) report having asthma, and 101 patients (8%) report having atopic dermatitis. Supporte
Affiliation of Co-Authors The Ohio State University College of Optometry, Washington University Medical School, Nova Southeastern University, Gundersen Lutheran, Southern California College of Optometry, Pennsylvania College of Optometry, National Eye Institute
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