A CASE REPORT OF BILATERAL PAPILLEDEMA SECONDARY TO PRESUMED IDIOPATHIC INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A PATIENT WITH PRIMARY ALDOSTERONISM

Title A CASE REPORT OF BILATERAL PAPILLEDEMA SECONDARY TO PRESUMED IDIOPATHIC INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A PATIENT WITH PRIMARY ALDOSTERONISM
Author, Co-Author GEMINI AURILLO, Raheela Shah
Topic
Year
2011
Day
Program Number
115055
Room
Amphitheater
Affiliation
Abstract BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a well-documented syndrome of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) without causative ventriculomegaly, mass or lesion and with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition. This condition was first described more than a century ago, yet there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis. Historically, this disease presents in overweight women. Rarely, it has been reported to be associated with underlying endocrine disorders such as Cushing’s syndrome, hyperthyroidism, or hyperaldosteronism.

CASE REPORT(S): This report presents a case of a now 53year-old African American male who initially presented with asymptomatic bilateral papilledema in 2003. Negative imaging and serology testing led to a diagnosis of IIH. The patient was treated by neurology with serial lumbar punctures initially then switched to systemic topiramate and acetalzolamide. Routine ophthalmic evaluations every three to six months revealed slowly resolving disc edema both eyes with only mild residual edema noted at last visit in March 2011. Additionally, in 2008, an adrenal adenoma was discovered, which resulted in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. The adenoma was surgically removed in 2010.

CONCLUSIONS: We report a case that highlights the rare association between IIH and primary aldosteronism.
Although limited, there are reports in literature discussing the association between these two syndromes
Affiliation of Co-Authors Baltimore VA Medical Center
Outline