A CASE OF TRAUMATIC EYE INJURY AND OCULAR REHABILITATION

Title A CASE OF TRAUMATIC EYE INJURY AND OCULAR REHABILITATION
Author, Co-Author Lisa Badowski, Debbie Hettler
Topic
Year
2004
Day
Program Number
Poster 32
Room
Affiliation
Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Administration Hospital
Abstract BACKGROUND: The force to the eye caused by blunt trauma can cause damage to many structures within resulting in decreased vision and /or blindness. Both acute and long-term management are equally important to optimize remaining vision. Acute findings may include hyphema, retinal detachment, iridodialysis, angle recession, uveitis, lacerations, vitreal/retinal hemorrhages, orbital fractures, optic nerve damage, or even perforation of the globe. Long-term sequelae may include: glaucoma, corneal scarring, pupil deformities, traumatic cataract, retinal scarring and neovascularization, decreased vision, glare, ocular muscle damage, diplopia and/or loss of binocularity.

CASE REPORT(S): In 1988, PH, a white male, was hit directly on the eye by a plastic soda bottle projectile while on active military duty. His acute injuries required extensive hospitalization and included: hyphema, iridodialysis, subluxated lens, vitreous hemorrhage and prolapse into anterior chamber, choroidal rupture, and medial wall blow-out fracture. His vision was reduced to light perception immediately after the accident. His long-term management over the past 16 years will be discussed and has included: retinal monitoring, cataract extraction with IOL implant, YAG capsulotomy, and glare management and cosmetic enhancement with therapeutic/prosthetic contact lenses and sunglasses. Central vision was lost, however he currently achieves 20/200 with peripheral vision. Fundus photos through various stages of treatment and resulting anterior segment photos after prosthetic contact lens fitting will be presented.

CONCLUSIONS: Diligent long-term management following a traumatic injury is necessary to monitor long-term sequelae and to maximize remaining functional vision. In the case where functional vision is lost, palliative care and/or prosthetic devices to provide maximal comfort, cosmesis, and residual binocularity are often required.
Affiliation of Co-Authors Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Administration Hospital
Outline