CLINICAL EDUCATION OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT: MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF CURRICULUM REFORM

Title CLINICAL EDUCATION OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT: MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF CURRICULUM REFORM
Author, Co-Author David Heath, Nancy Carlson
Topic
Year
1992
Day
Monday
Program Number
Poster 73
Room
Great Hall
Affiliation
Abstract In an era when colleges of optometry must rapidly modify their curricula to stay abreast of the changes in the scope of practice, ongoing curricular assessment is crucial to insure that changes are effective and efficient. Most efforts at curricular reform occur within sub-curricular packages, e.g., disciplines, clinical years, etc. Accordingly, outcome measures need to be formative and targeted at discrete curricular modules, rather than simply towards the end of the four year course of study. In optometric education, the clinical curriculum is designed for the sequential development of clinical skills and may be thought of as a series of stages, each with entry and exit competencies. The assessed exit competencies of one stage should approximate the expected entry level competency of the next. With the implementation of a new second and third year clinical curriculum at the New England College of Optometry in 1991, a clinical skills survey instrument was designed around this concept. The survey uses a five point scale across sixty items to measure faculty perception of students' clinical skills in the diagnosis and management of common clinical problems. The end of the second and third years were identified as major transition points in the clinical program. Faculty who teach on either side of these two transition points (four responder groups) were asked to assess the students' exit/entry level competencies using the survey. The response rate was approximately sixty percent. The statistical disparity on survey items between groups provided detailed, formative information for the ongoing review of clinical and didactic curriculum and insured an approximate articulation of expected competencies between stages of clinical training. The survey has been used for two years and has been expanded to include self assessment by the students. A detailed analysis of the survey results is presented along with recommendations for the effective design and use of out
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline