Comparison of gross chromatic, grated and luminescent stimuli and their effect on visual attention in children with cortical vision impairment

Title Comparison of gross chromatic, grated and luminescent stimuli and their effect on visual attention in children with cortical vision impairment
Author, Co-Author Karen Squier
Topic Low Vision
Year
2016
Day
Thursday
Program Number
165139
Room
Ballroom A-B
Affiliation
Southern College of Optometry
Abstract

Purpose: The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate changes in visual behaviors of children with cortical vision impairment (CVI) when presented with different targets: a penlight, grated target or chromatic blocksVisual assessment for children with CVI can range from assessment of basic visual skills to more sophisticated testing, such as with visual evoked potential measurements. CVI patients may respond to certain stimuli more efficiently than others, and test modifications should be considered when attempting to assess visual abilities.

Methods: This study was completed in the low vision clinic at The Chicago Lighthouse. Nine (9) patients with a confirmed diagnosis of cortical vision impairment were recruited. Each patient had visual function assessed binocularly. Each subject was be presented with three different stimuli: a Transilluminator with full illumination, an 8 ½ by 11 inch color blocks in red, green, blue and yellow and a grated target. Patient responses were recorded as: No change to visual behavior, Brief fixation, Maintain fixation, but no following, Brief fixation and following, or Fixating and following of target.

Results: There was no statistical difference in visual behavior when children with CVI were presented with red targets (p = 0.54) or yellow targets (p = 0.40) compared to grated targets or penlights. Green and Blue targets had a statistically significant difference in their ability to effect a difference in visual behaviors compared to traditional pen light and grated acuities. 

Conclusions: Children with CVI are just as likely to respond to red or yellow color targets as they are a grated acuity or penlights. This is helpful to demonstrate that children who do not respond to traditional testing may respond to modifications in improving basic visual scanning. Using yellow or red targets may stimulate a child’s ability to fixate and follow, a basic visual motor skill.

Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline