A COMPARISON OF SELF-REPORTED DRY EYE BETWEEN CONTACT LENS AND NON-CONTACT LENS WEARING INDIVIDUALS

Title A COMPARISON OF SELF-REPORTED DRY EYE BETWEEN CONTACT LENS AND NON-CONTACT LENS WEARING INDIVIDUALS
Author, Co-Author Corrie Ziegler, Crystal Gardner, G. Lynn Mitchell, Kelly Nichols, Jason Nichols
Topic
Year
2004
Day
Thursday
Program Number
Room
Affiliation
The Ohio State University, College of Optometry
Abstract PURPOSE: We recently reported on a simple screening survey called the Contact Lens Dry Eye Questionnaire (CLDEQ) intended to classify dry eye status in contact lens wearer. The purpose of this report is to address the discriminative validity of the instrument.

METHODS: The CLDEQ was administered to 342 contact lens wearing subjects, 46 spectacle wearers, and 56 clinically emmetropic individuals. The content of the survey includes two symptom questions (dryness and light sensitivity) and a self-perception question (i.e., Do you think you have dry eyes?). Dryness and light sensitivity scales are then calculated, summed, and scored categorically as follows: if a patients responds "yes" to the self-perception question and scores greater than 0.03, they are classified with dry eye disease whereas a "no" or "unsure" response with a score greater than 1.29 indicates a dry eye classification. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with self-reported dry eye.

RESULTS: Contact lens wearers were most likely to self-report dry eye disease (52.3% of contact lens wearers), followed by spectacle wearers (23.9% of spectacle wearers) and clinical emmetropes (7.1% of clinical emmetropes). In a logistic regression controlling for subject’s age and gender, there was a significant association between correction type and self-reported dry eye disease (p<0.001). Both spectacle wearers (aOR=0.083, p<0.001) and clinical emmetropes (aOR=0.269, p<0.001) were less likely to report dry eye disease. There was a marginally significant difference between spectacle wearers and clinically emmetropic subjects (aOR=3.23, p=0.066) with an increased odds of dry eye disease among the spectacle wearers. Gender was also related to self-reported dry eye disease with males less likely to report dry eye (aOR=0.480, p=0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Contact lens wearers are much more likely to self-report dry eye disease than spectacle wearers and clinical emmetropes.
Affiliation of Co-Authors The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry
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