A COMPARISON OF SODIUM HYALURONATE CONCENTRATIONS ON THE RELIEF OF DRY EYE SYMPTOMS

Title A COMPARISON OF SODIUM HYALURONATE CONCENTRATIONS ON THE RELIEF OF DRY EYE SYMPTOMS
Author, Co-Author Janna Zbozien, Jr. Connor
Topic
Year
2003
Day
Program Number
Poster 22
Room
Affiliation
Southern College of Optometry
Abstract PURPOSE: Several studies have reported that sodium hyaluronate is able to improve both symptoms and signs in patients with dry eye. Previously, with a double blind study, we have shown improved comfort and relief with this viscoelastic in a 0.1% concentration to be superior to artificial tears alone; however, the desired effects were short-lived. The present study investigates whether higher concentrations of sodium hyaluronate will increase the duration of relief.

METHODS: Twenty-two subjects (9 males and 13 females) currently using artificial tears for dry eye symptoms were enrolled in this study. Mean age was 34.78 yrs with a range from 23 to 70 yrs. The study was double blind design. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups. One received 0.3% supplemented tears, while the other received 0.4% supplemented tears for two weeks. After two weeks, the groups were reversed. Baseline TBUT and Schirmer were measured and repeated every two weeks. Subjects also completed a questionnaire after the use of each drop.

RESULTS: There was a statistical difference in TBUT between baseline and both 0.3% and 0.4% concentrations, but no statistical difference was found for Schirmer. TBUT was 3.58 sec (baseline), 6.95 (0.3%), and 3.99 (0.4%). Schirmer was 12.93mm (baseline), 12.52 (0.3%), and 13.2 (0.4%). Patient questionnaire revealed that patients using 0.3% had twice the relief compared to those using 0.4%. 90% of subjects reported improvement using the 0.3% compared to 0.4% sodium hyaluronate.

CONCLUSIONS: No adverse reactions were reported with Na hyaluronate. Comfort and relief appeared to be superior with 0.3% as compared to 0.4%. Based on TBUT improvement, it appears 0.3% sodium hyaluronate enhances the stability of the tear film and may be a valuable additive to artificial tears.
Affiliation of Co-Authors Southern College of Optometry
Outline