CSF AND REACTION TIME DIFFERENCES IN YOUNG AND ELDERLY SUBJECTS WITH POLARIZED AND TINTED LENSES IN A DRIVING ENVIRONMENT

Title CSF AND REACTION TIME DIFFERENCES IN YOUNG AND ELDERLY SUBJECTS WITH POLARIZED AND TINTED LENSES IN A DRIVING ENVIRONMENT
Author, Co-Author George Zikos, Richard Nason, Rocco Robilotto, Arkady Selenow, Steven Ali
Topic
Year
2009
Day
Thursday
Program Number
95996
Room
Crystal H
Affiliation
Institute for Vision Research, MVA
Abstract PURPOSE: To compare the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) and reaction times (RT) in young subjects and compare with elderly pseudophakes while wearing equal absorption polarized (P) and tinted (T) sunglasses in a simulated daytime driving environment

METHODS: Subjects were tested wearing the two plano sunglasses with rear surface AR while seated behind a car windsheld and a simulated dashboard. 10 klux illuminance was created to simulate mid-morning/-afternoon lighting conditions. CSF was tested by measuring thresholds with a combination of contrast and resolution targets using a tumbling "E" with contour interaction bars at a test distance of 6M. The Cambridge Research Systems Ltd. ViSaGe on a SONY GDM-F20 CRT was used to conduct a four-alternative forced choice linear staircase procedure. Reaction times were calculated by using the correct responses at threshold level. The subjects were optimally corrected and tested binocularly. 22 normal young (Y) subjects (mean=26ys), and five visually normal pseudophakic (E) subjects (mean=69ys), were tested

RESULTS: Polarizing lenses were found to provide both improved contrast and reaction times during simulated daylight driving conditions in both subject groups

CSF was significantly improved for both groups with the P lenses and significantly decreased in the E group. (p<0.01) AUTCSF was 20% larger when using the P lenses

RT was significantly shorter with the P lenses for all subjects and increased the E group (mean RT: Young: P=1164ms, T=1232ms; p<0.05, Elderly: P=1837ms, T=2161ms; p<0.01). The effect was greater in magnitude for the pseudophakic subjects: 323 ms on average as compared to 68ms for the N group

CONCLUSIONS: Contrast sensitivity and reaction times can be significantly improved by using polarized sunglasses when driving in daytime. This result has implications in respect to driving comfort and safety and it may particularly apply in patients with decreased contrast sensitivity (from cataracts or other conditions)

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Support: Essilor USA
Affiliation of Co-Authors Institute for Vision Research, MVA, Institute for Vision Research, MVA, Institute for Vision Research, MVA, Institute for Vision Research, MVA
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