DMAX FOR STEREOSCOPIC DEPTH PERCEPTION WITH SIMULATED MONOVISION CORRECTION

Title DMAX FOR STEREOSCOPIC DEPTH PERCEPTION WITH SIMULATED MONOVISION CORRECTION
Author, Co-Author Samuel Adeseye, Jin Qian, Saumil Patel, Scott Stevenson, Harold Bedell
Topic
Year
2007
Day
Wednesday
Program Number
075016
Room
Affiliation
University of Houston, College of Optometry
Abstract PURPOSE: Persons who wear monovision correction typically receive a clear image in one eye and a blurred image in the other eye. Although monovision is known to elevate the minimum stereoscopic threshold, it is uncertain how it influences the largest binocular disparity for which the direction of depth can reliably be perceived (Dmax). In this study, we compared the Dmax for stereo when one eye’s image is blurred to the Dmax when both eyes’ images are either blurred or clear.

METHODS: The stimulus was a pair of vertically oriented, random-line patterns, presented for 500 ms above and below a fixation cross. To simulate monovision correction, the images of the line patterns presented to one eye were low-pass filtered and the patterns presented to the other eye were unfiltered. In different blocks of trials, the amount of simulated blur was 1.5 or 2.5 D (assuming 4 mm pupils). The subject reported if the upper line pattern was nearer or farther than the lower line pattern. Dmax was defined as the maximum image disparity corresponding to 75% correct responses.

RESULTS: Although considerable variability exists among the four observers, Dmax is consistently smaller (median: 37%; range: 9- 91%) for simulated monocular blur than when the targets presented to both eyes are blurred equally. In general, Dmax also is smaller (median: 20%; range: 2- 87%) when one eye’s image is blurred than when clear images are presented to both eyes. The effect of blur on Dmax tended to be larger with 2.5 D compared to 1.5 D of simulated blur.

CONCLUSIONS: In conjunction with the previously documented elevation of the minimum stereoscopic threshold, the reduction of Dmax with monocular blur indicates that the range of useful stereoscopic depth perception is likely to be compressed in patients who wear monovision corrections.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Support: T35 EY07088 and a University of Houston, College of Optometry VRSG award.
Affiliation of Co-Authors University of Houston, College of Optometry, University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston, University of Houston, College of Optometry, University of Houston, College of Optometry
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