DOES CHILDREN'S NEAR WORK INTERACT STATISTICALLY WITH PARENTAL REFRACTIVE HISTORY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF JUVENILE MYOPIA?

Title DOES CHILDREN'S NEAR WORK INTERACT STATISTICALLY WITH PARENTAL REFRACTIVE HISTORY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF JUVENILE MYOPIA?
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, Donald Mutti, Robert Fusaro, William Satariano, Nina Friedman, Robert Sholtz, Anthony Adams
Topic
Year
1995
Day
Sunday
Program Number
1:00 pm
Room
Elmwood
Affiliation
Abstract PURPOSE. We previously reported a stronger association between childhood myopia and heredity compared to environmental factors. We are examining these relationships further to determine whether environmental factors are more strongly associated with myopia among children whose parents report a history of myopia, ie, that myopic children inherit some susceptibility to their environment.

METHODS. We fit multiple logistic regression models to cross-sectional 1993 Orinda Longitudinal Study of Myopia data from 738 schoolchildren (6 to 15 years). Parental history of myopia (0-2 myopic parents, PHM) and children's near work (diopter-hours, Dhrs) were obtained from self-administered questionnaires. The primary outcome, observed among 68 subjects, was a binary indicator of myopia, defined as a refractive error of at least -0.75 D in both principal meridians.

RESULTS. The odds ratios (OR (95% confidence limits)) for myopia among children with PHM=2 and PHM=1 vs. PHM=0 (adjusting for the child's age and log(Dhrs)) were 5.12 (2.37, 11.10) and 1.32 (0.60, 2.91), respectively. By contrast, the OR for a 1 log unit increase in Dhrs, while controlling for age and PHM, was 1.49 (0.86, 2.56). We modeled statistical interactions between these variables by including product terms and found no statistically significant improvement in the model's fit (p=0.28). The point estimates, however, suggest that if an interaction does exist (on the logit scale), the statistical interaction between PHM and Dhrs is actually negative. For example, the OR for 1 unit of log(Dhrs) increase among children with 2 myopic parents is 0.96 (0.43, 2.12); the ORs for a similar difference among children with 1 or 0 parents are 2.48 (0.97, 6.38) and 1.72 (0.51, 5.82), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS. Our results do not show near work is more strongly associated with childhood myopia among children with a parental history of myopia. Supported by NIH-NEI R01-EY08893.
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline