THE EFFECT OF PARENTAL HISTORY OF MYOPIA AND NEAR WORK ON CHILDREN'S OCULAR COMPONENTS

Title THE EFFECT OF PARENTAL HISTORY OF MYOPIA AND NEAR WORK ON CHILDREN'S OCULAR COMPONENTS
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, OD PhD, William Satariano, Donald Mutti, Nina Friedman, OD MS, Robert Sholtz, Anthony Adams
Topic
Year
1993
Day
Saturday
Program Number
2:30 pm
Room
Salon F
Affiliation
Abstract The Orinda Longitudinal Study of Myopia examines whether ocular optical components, family refractive error history, and environmental variables can predict incident cases of myopia. We divided 716 children ages 6 to 14 years into three risk groups based on their parents' reported refractive error history: both, either, or neither parent(s) with juvenile onset myopia. A variable, diopter-hours, was created from the parents' report of their children's visual activity (diopter-hours = 3 X hours spent reading per week + 2 X hours spent playing video games per week + hours spent watching television per week). Analysis of covariance was performed using our baseline cross-sectional data to study the effect of parental history and diopter- hours adjusting for grade in school (as a proxy for age) on refractive error, corneal power, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, vitreous chamber depth, and lens power. No interaction terms were significant in the models generated, and analyses therefore exclude the interactions. Even with prevalent cases of myopia (at least -0.75 D in both meridians) excluded, parental history has an effect. The children with both parents myopic show less hyperopia and greater anterior and vitreous chamber depths than those with either or neither parent myopic. Corneal curvature, lens thickness, and lens power are not significant. In the entire sample, the model incorporating parental history is a better predictor than the model with parental history and diopter-hours for every ocular component except refractive error, confirming an association between refractive error, near work, and heredity with heredity as the more significant term. Adding parental history to a diopter-hours model improves the model's predictive ability for every ocular component except corneal power and lens thickness. These results indicate that the pre-myopic eye, at risk by virtue of a positive family history of myopia, is already larger and less
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline