THE EFFECTS OF INTERPALPEBRAL AND LID ATTACHMENT CONTACT LENS FITTING TECHNIQUES ON CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHY AS MEASURED BY THE TOPOGRAPHIC MODELING SYSTEM

Title THE EFFECTS OF INTERPALPEBRAL AND LID ATTACHMENT CONTACT LENS FITTING TECHNIQUES ON CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHY AS MEASURED BY THE TOPOGRAPHIC MODELING SYSTEM
Author, Co-Author Timothy Edrington, Heidi Hsue, Patrick Caroline, Ronald Watanabe
Topic
Year
1992
Day
Monday
Program Number
Poster 7
Room
Great Hall
Affiliation
Abstract The term "corneal warpage" is used to describe changes in corneal topography induced by contact lenses. After corneal warpage develops, the curvature changes are often persistent and not easily reversible. Several studies which used the keratometer or keratoscope to monitor corneal topography have not shown any significant differences in curvature changes between patients whose contact lenses positioned centrally and those whose lenses die not. However, a study by Kame et al. using a photokeratoscope concluded that corneal topography changes can be influenced by the lens-cornea bearing relationship. We used the Topographic Modeling System (TMS-1) to assess corneal topography changes induced by the wearing of interpalpebral and lid attachment fitting RGP contact lenses. Thirteen subjects without histories of contact lens wear were fitted; one eye of each subject was randomized into the interpalpebral arm of the study and the other eye was fitted lid attachment. Keratographic results from the TMS-1 revealed that the differences between the interpalpebral and lid attachment fitting methods were not clinically significant at the following nine locations: central, 1.5mm and 3mm out from center along the horizontal and vertical meridians. The overall mean difference between the two fitting methods was 0.07 diopters. This was not statistically significant (F = 0.19, P = 0.67).
Affiliation of Co-Authors
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