EFFICACY OF A PEDIATRIC CYCLOPLEGIC ADMINISTERED AS A SPRAY

Title EFFICACY OF A PEDIATRIC CYCLOPLEGIC ADMINISTERED AS A SPRAY
Author, Co-Author Jimmy Bartlett, Michael Wesson, Janet Swiatocha, Thomas Woolley
Topic
Year
1992
Day
Sunday
Program Number
Poster 25
Room
Great Hall
Affiliation
Abstract The topical administration of eyedrops in children is often an unpleasant procedure associated with significant burning, stinging, tearing, and emotional ambivalence. One advantage of a spray is that the drug can be applied to closed eyelids without the child assuming an awkward position. We used a prospective, examiner-masked, parallel-group study design and randomized subjects into four groups such that a combination cycloplegic solution was administered under the following conditions: 1) eyedrops to eyes that were closed; 2) eyedrops to eyes that were open; 3) spray to eyes that were closed; 4) spray to eyes that were open. Both eyes of each subject received the solutions administered under one of the four conditions. Residual accommodation was measured using dynamic retinoscopy or the subjective push-up method, where applicable, at times 0, 10, 20, 30, 45 and 60 minutes following administration of the medications. A total of 38 subjects ranging in age from 6 months to 12 years 9 months completed the study. Repeated measures analysis of covariance revealed no significant difference (p>0.05) in cycloplegic efficacy among the four methods of drug administration. This study suggests that administration of cycloplegics by spray is an efficacious as eyedrop instillation and may have important clinical advantages over standard ophthalmic eyedrops administered to children. Study funded, in part or entirely, by NEI Core Grant EY-03039 and by Biomedical Research Support Grant RR05807
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline