GLOBAL DIRECTION DISCRIMINATION IN THE CENTRAL AND PARACENTRAL VISUAL FIELD.

Title GLOBAL DIRECTION DISCRIMINATION IN THE CENTRAL AND PARACENTRAL VISUAL FIELD.
Author, Co-Author Robert Wojciechowski, Gary Trick, Scott Steinman
Topic
Year
1992
Day
Monday
Program Number
Poster 29
Room
Great Hall
Affiliation
Abstract The ability to discriminate the direction of object motion is a fundamental visual capability. This capability is reduced by many conditions including normal aging and the onset of ocular disease. As a first step in developing a system for perimetric analysis of global motion sensitivity we examined direction discrimination in the central and paracentral visual field. Random dot motion targets (12.3 deg) were either centrally fixated or presented 7.7 deg away from fixation. Inferior, superior, nasal and temporal paracentral locations were tested. The random dot motion stimuli were presented for 300 msec at a velocity of 12.5 deg/sec. Dot size was 14.8' and contrast was set at 33.7%. Direction discrimination was quantified by determining the threshold for correct detection of randomly positioned dots moving coherently (in space and time) in a background of random dot motion. The right and left eyes of five visually normal adult observers (ages 21-42) were tested. Since no difference between eyes was observed, data for the two eyes of each subject were averaged. A significant difference in direction discrimination was observed as a function of target location (ANOVA, pALTERNATIVES TO TENURE
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline