GLOBAL MOTION PERCEPTION: A COMPARISON OF MONOCULAR AND BINOCULAR SENSITIVITY

Title GLOBAL MOTION PERCEPTION: A COMPARISON OF MONOCULAR AND BINOCULAR SENSITIVITY
Author, Co-Author Louis Thibault, Gary Trick, Helene L.Sc.O., Scott O.D.
Topic
Year
1992
Day
Sunday
Program Number
Poster 40
Room
Great Hall
Affiliation
Abstract The ability to perceive object motion is a fundamental capability of human visual perception. While it is known that binocular vision often enhances visual sensitivity, it is not known whether binocular motion sensitivity exceeds monocular levels. To address this question we examined monocular and binocular motion sensitivity using a direction discrimination paradigm to evaluate global motion perception in 10 visually normal adult subjects. Motion sensitivity was quantified by determining direction discrimination thresholds for detecting dot elements moving coherently (i.e. moving contiguously in space and time) relative to a random-dot BACKGROUND: A large (25[deg sign]) centrally fixated array of 200 moving dots was presented for 0.494 seconds. Four test conditions which included two dot velocities (4.2 and 12.5[deg sign]/sec) and two contrast levels (16 and 44%) were employed. Direction discrimination thresholds were determined by probit analysis. A statistically significant increase (23%) in motion sensitivity was observed under binocular viewing conditions (ANOVA, pLOW VISION MANAGEMENT OF A PATIENT WITH END-STAGE PRIMARY OPEN ANGLE GLAUCOMA USING A NEW METHOD OF THE PRISM RELOCATION TECHNIQUE
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline