IMPACT OF SCARRING IN KERATOCONUS

Title IMPACT OF SCARRING IN KERATOCONUS
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, Joseph Barr, Timothy Edrington, Brad Wilson, Jason Nichols, Mae Gordon, The Study Group
Topic
Year
1998
Day
Saturday
Program Number
1:20 pm
Room
Continental Ballroom 5
Affiliation
The Ohio State University College of Optometry
Abstract Purpose. The Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Keratoconus (CLEK) Study is a longitudinal study of keratoconus patients conducted at 15 clinical sites. We report on the impact of corneal scarring in these patients.

METHODS. A total of 1,209 Study-eligible keratoconus patients were enrolled and examined. Patient-reported and clinician-assessed variables, including patient-reported vision, glare effects, contact lens wear, and work-related issues and high and low contrast visual acuity and refraction, were measured and examined for associations with central corneal scarring.

RESULTS. The percentage of eyes with very good (20/20 or better) high contrast entrance acuity varies markedly with scarring (23.02% of unscarred eyes versus 6.39% of scarred eyes). Likewise, the percentage of eyes with poor (20/200 or worse) high contrast entrance visual acuity varies with scarring status (1.95% of unscarred eyes versus 7.89% of scarred eyes). There are no scarred eyes with low contrast entrance visual acuity of 20/20 or better, and only 11.74% of the scarred eyes achieve low contrast entrance visual acuity between 20/20 and 20/40 compared to 33.74% of the unscarred eyes. The percentage of eyes with very good (20/20 or better) high contrast best corrected acuity varies markedly with scarring status (34.27% of unscarred eyes compared with 11.88% of scarred eyes) as does the percentage of eyes with poor (20/200 or worse) high contrast best corrected acuity (0.12% of unscarred eyes versus 1.92% of scarred eyes). Even when controlling for age, contact lens wear, and disease severity, there is a marked association between corneal scarring and visual acuity and between corneal scarring and patient-reported effects of glare on their vision.

CONCLUSION. Corneal scarring has a marked impact on vision in keratoconus. Supported by NIH-NEI grants U10 EY10419, EY10069, and EY10077.
Affiliation of Co-Authors The Ohio State University College of Optometry, The Ohio State University College of Optometry, Southern California College of Optometry, Washington University Medical School, The Ohio State University College of Optometry, Washington University Medical School
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