IMPROVED DRY EYE RELIEF WITH SODIUM HYALURONATE SUPPLEMENTED ARTIFICIAL TEARS

Title IMPROVED DRY EYE RELIEF WITH SODIUM HYALURONATE SUPPLEMENTED ARTIFICIAL TEARS
Author, Co-Author Janna Zbozien, Jr. Connor
Topic
Year
2002
Day
Program Number
Poster 99
Room
Affiliation
Abstract PURPOSE: Topical dry eye therapy only provides palliative and transient relief of patient symptoms. Recent work from European laboratories have shown that Sodium hyaluronate supplemented artificial tears resulted in subjectively increased patient comfort compared to standard artificial tears. This study compares Sodium hyaluronate supplemented artificial tears to an identical formulation without Sodium hyaluronate.



METHODS: Ten subjects (7 males and 3 females) currently using artificial tears for dry eye symptoms were enrolled in this study. Mean age was 35.6 yrs with a range from 23 to 55 yrs. The study was double blind design. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: one received artificial tears, the other 0.1% supplemented tears for two weeks. After two weeks, the groups were reversed. Baseline TBUT and Schirmer were measured and repeated every two weeks. Subjects also completed a questionnaire after the use of each drop.C

RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in TBUT or Schirmer with either drop from baseline. TBUT was 5.7 sec (baseline), 6.3 (artificial tear), 6.45 (Na hyaluronate). Schirmer was 12.3mm (baseline), 14.8 (artificial tear), 14.1 (Na hyaluronate). Patient questionnaire revealed 70% of subjects felt immediate relief with Na hyaluronate drops. Average relief lasted at least 1 hour, while the average subject only got 30 min. of relief with artificial tears. 90% of subjects reported that their eyes felt better with Na hyaluronate.

CONCLUSIONS: No adverse reactions were reported with Na hyaluronate. Comfort and relief appeared to be superior to artificial tears alone. The addition of Na hyaluronate may be beneficial to dry eye patients due to its viscoelastic properties that lubricate the ocular surface reducing friction during blinking and eye movements.
Affiliation of Co-Authors Southern College of Optometry
Outline