INCIDENT MYOPIA AND PARENTAL HISTORY OF MYOPIA

Title INCIDENT MYOPIA AND PARENTAL HISTORY OF MYOPIA
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, John R. Hayes, Lisa A. Jones, Donald O. Mutti, G. Lynn Mitchell, Ruth E. Manny, Robert N. Kleinstein, Julie A. Yu, the CLEERE Study Group
Topic
Year
2003
Day
Thursday
Program Number
Room
Affiliation
The Ohio State University, College of Optometry
Abstract PURPOSE: To investigate children’s myopia as a function of their number of myopic parents.

METHODS: Children in grades 1–8 were recruited and examined during the 1989-90 through 2001-2002 academic years at four clinical sites that recruited African Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and Whites. Incident cases of myopia through a maximum of eight years of follow-up were defined as at least-0.75 D of myopia (spherical equivalent from cycloplegic autorefraction) in a child who had not previously exhibited this level of myopia. The data were analyzed using analysis of covariance with Tukey adjusted post hoc comparisons.

RESULTS: There were 211 incident myopes with no myopic parents, 226 with one myopic parent, and 173 with two myopic parents. The mean refractive error at study entrance for these 3 groups of children (adjusted for age at study entrance) was 0.20 D, 0.28 D, and 0.18 D (p=0.08). Their mean ages at myopia onset, adjusted for age at study entrance and age at the last study visit, were 10.90 years, 10.81 years, and 10.51 years (p=0.004). The mean annual myopic progression was not significantly different among groups (0-parent: -0.57 D/year; 1-parent group: -0.58 D/year; 2-parent group: -0.67 D/year; p=0.069). The children with two myopic parents were more myopic at their last study visit compared to the other two groups (2-parent: -2.25 +/- 1.34 D; 1-parent: -1.71 +/- 0.99 D; 0-parent: -1.62 +/- 0.76 D). The 2-parent group was also older at their last study visit compared to the other two groups (2-parent: 12.13 +/- 1.70 years; 1-parent: 11.85 +/- 1.94 years; 0-parent: 11.35 +/- 2.18 years; p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Beyond the well-described association in children of myopia with a parental history of myopia, there may be an effect wherein the children of two myopic parents develop their myopia sooner and end up with a greater degree of myopia.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Supported by NIH/NEI grants U10-EY08893 and R21-EY12273, the Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation, and the EF Wildermuth Foundation.
Affiliation of Co-Authors The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, University of Houston, College of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Optometry, The Medical Center, Marshall B. Ketchum University, College of Optometry
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