Academy 2012 Phoenix Lectures & Workshops

Download the final Education Grid (PDF).

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Friday, October 26, 2012

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

8:00 AM


            
North Ballroom D

SD-01
Jeffry Gerson, A. Paul Chous

Diabetes Trends: What's New and What's Still True


This course discusses the latest literature and trends in diabetes care.  Eyecare is discussed, as well as how changes in systemic care of diabetes affects our patients, practices, and the care we provide.
 1 hour


Room 122 A-C

PS-01
Joseph Pizzimenti, Carlo Pelino

No Laughing Matter: Disorders of the Vitreous Humor


The primary eye care provider plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of vitreo-retinal conditions that can result in significant vision loss. Diseases of the vitreous and vitreo-retinal interface include PVD, vitreous floaters, cells, and hemorrhage, epimacular membrane, VMT syndrome, macular hole, and retinal breaks/detachment.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

OP-01
Derek Cunningham

The Pain Game - Playing with Pain


The Pain game will review unique properties of the eyes that contribute to the atypical presentations of ocular pain.  Systemic and ocular analgesics will be detailed for efficacy and utility.  Common clinical presentations will serve as a basis for reviewing treatment choices.
1 hour


Room 22 A-C

CL-01
Matthew Lampa

Custom Soft Contact Lens Design and Prescribing

This course highlights custom soft contact lens prescribing for both the regular and irregular cornea.  The majority of soft contact lenses manufactured today are designed for the average cornea.  This lecture explores the dynamic relationship between corneal diameter, curvature and depth.
1 hour


Room 124 A-B

NO-01
Tiffenie Harris

Demyelinating Disorders and Ocular Manifestations: MS or not MS?


This course provides a concise overview of demyelinating diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Ocular manifestations of these conditions serve as differential diagnoses in cases of optic neuritis and cranial nerve disorders. Although the most likely diagnosis may be MS, there are others to consider.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

GO-01
Fraser Horn

You Play What Sport? Introduction to Sports Vision through Case Discussion


This course will introduce Sports vision fundamentals and techniques that a primary care practitioner can integrate into their practice are introduced utilizing sports vision cases.  Each case introduces concepts, literature review, and evaluation techniques.  Discussion also covers recent advances in sports vision.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-01
Robert Greer

Under - stand Magnifiers: What's Going on Below the Lens


Confidently prescribing stand magnifiers can be one of the most difficult tasks facing a doctor caring for patients with low vision. This course describes the theory behind stand magnifiers (including dome and ruler magnifiers), how to measure the necessary parameters in-office and how to prescribe appropriately.
1 hour


9:00 AM


North Ballroom D

PS-02
Steven Ferrucci

Update on Age-Related Macular Degeneration


New treatments in the fight against macular degeneration are currently under investigation.  This course highlights some of the new treatment modalities as well as new theories in the prevention of ARMD.
1 hour


Room 122 A-C

SD-02
Brad Sutton

Sleep Apnea and the Eye


Obstructive sleep apnea is a relatively common yet underdiagnosed condition with significant associated systemic and ocular conditions. This course covers sleep apnea and its management in detail, as well as associated systemic and ocular concerns. Floppy eyelid syndrome, NAION, normal tension glaucoma and other ocular patholgies are included.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

SD-03
David Sendrowski, Franklin Lusby

Systemic Viral Infections and Ocular Complications


Viral infections are common throughout a patient's lifetime. These acquired viral infections may manifest secondary ocular complications or begin as an ocular complaint. The lecture covers both types of presentations along with their ocular and systemic treatment and management.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-02
Thomas Quinn

Soft Toric Advances and Fitting Trends


Learn clinically useful tips on fitting toric soft contact lenses.   Particular attention is given to patient selection, lens fitting assessment and the benefits provided by toric lenses made with silicone hydrogel materials.
1 hour


Room 124 A-B

GO-02
Steven Schwartz

Psychiatric Conditions Commonly Seen in Optometric Practice


Psychiatric disorders are seen frequently in optometric practice. This fast-paced course provides an overview of the major psychiatric disorders that the primary care optometrist is likely to encounter. General diagnostic criteria and treatment options are discussed. An emphasis is placed on conditions most relevant to optometric practice.  
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-01
Paul Harris

The Diagnosis and Treatment of Visual Disorders in a Population of Professional Athletes Post-Concussion


Head injuries in sports have helped to bring attention to how debilitating concussions are.  This course gives insights into how optometrists work with athletes in both diagnosing and treating the visual system following TBI.  The cases cited in this course are exclusively drawn from professional athletes that Dr. Harris has worked with.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-02
Khadija Shahid, Bernard Szirth

The Bionic Eye: A Review of How Close We Are to Replacing the Human Eye


The prevalence of blinding diseases is increasing. Treatment of vision loss is often limited to stabilization and rehabilitation, with little hope of sight restoration. We review current and future research in nano and micro technologies entrenched in new devices for the treatment of blindness through the use of visual prosthetic devices.
1 hour


Room 224 A

WK-01
Stephen Byrnes, Ronald Watanabe

Fitting GP Contact Lenses Beyond the Limbus


During this workshop participants are introduced to a variety of corneo-scleral, mini-scleral and scleral GP lens designs. Using either a shared bearing fitting strategy or a corneal vaulting strategy, the participants fit each other with a lens from each category. Lens fits are reviewed in a grand rounds format.
2 hours


10:00 AM


North Ballroom D

AS-01
Paul Karpecki

Differential Diagnosis of Unique Ocular Disease Presentations

This course is a series of actual ocular disease cases that don''t give a "textbook" presentation but require a proper diagnosis and treatment to avoid potential devastating complications.  Attendees participate in determining a sound differential diagnosis, the ultimate diagnosis and the most effective treatment and management options.
2 hours


Room 122 A-C

SD-04
Kimberly Reed

Obesity: Beyond the Golden Arches


The obesity pandemic in the U.S. is a serious public health threat. In addition to an evidence-based discussion about the ocular and systemic effects of obesity including Type II diabetes, this course presents obesity''s psychosocial impacts, new research regarding genetic influences on body composition, & current weight reduction strategies.
2 hours CEE


Room 221 A-C

SD-05
Christian Thompson, Valerie Sharpe

Rheumatology Rules for Uveitis


This lecture highlights the importance of collaboration between optometry and rheumatology in the management of uveitis. Emphasis is placed upon current classification schemes, diagnostic testing and treatment modalities. The provider will also gain further understanding of autoimmune conditions associated with uveitis.
2 hours


Room 222 A-C

CL-03
Patrick Caroline, Randy Kojima

Contemporary Management of the Irregular Cornea with Contact Lenses


A case history format will review a wide range of contemporary GP, custom soft and scleral lens designs for managing the regular and irregular astigmatism following corneal injury, surgery and disease.
2 hours


Room 226 A-C

BV-02
John Tassinari, Eric Borsting

An Eye on Reading


A common entering patient complaint is inefficiency when reading. Specific symptoms include loss of place and reading slowly. Eye movement disorders can be associated with these reading complaints. This course provides clinically useful information about the reading process,reading ability and diagnosis and management of eye movement disorders.
2 hours


Room 227 A-C

GO-03
Sherry Bass

The Differential Diagnosis of Functional vs. Pathological Vision Loss


It is convenient to diagnose amblyopia when there is an unexplainable vision loss. But ocular and neurological disease can masquerade as amblyopia. This course reviews the diagnostic criteria for amblyopia and presents cases of retinal and visual pathway disease that have been misdiagnosed as functional vision loss, sometimes with dire consequences
2 hours CEE


Room 224 B

WK-02
Elizabeth Steele, Caroline Pate

Enhancing Your Peripheral Retinal Examination

Peripheral retinal examination and scleral indentation are vital aspects of patient care.Technology creates difficult choices when selecting a BIO and condensing lenses.This course reviews basic and advanced techniques with live demonstration and hands-on experience. Attendees will sit as patients. A variety of BIOs and lenses will be available.

2 hours


2:00 PM


North Ballroom D

OP-02
Tammy Than

Ophthalmic Therapeutic Update


This course reviews the newest topical and systemic medications used in the treatment of ocular disease. Benefits of using the new drugs over existing medications are discussed along with contraindications and potential side effects. The use of case examples emphasize the clinical indications.
2 hours CEE


Room 121 A-C

SD-06
Edward Chu

Preventing Stroke in your Patients


Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States and the second most common cause of death worldwide. A comprehensive eye exam can reveal evidence of past stroke, risk for future stroke, and most importantly, a current ischemic event in a symptomatic patient.
1 hour


Room 122 A-C

AS-02
Susan Resnick

A New View of MGD: The Leading Cause of Dry Eye
Can Be Treated!

Challenges in the treatment and management of evaporative dry eye include the reliability of diagnostic methods and patient compliance with therapeutic regimens. Ongoing scientific research on meibomian gland dysfunction has led to recent advances in diagnostic devices and innovative treatment modalities aimed at improving clinical outcomes.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

GL-03
Robert Dunphy

Evaluation of the Anterior Chamber Angle Structure via OCT


Most OCT devices can image the anterior segment to yield important information about iris contour and structural relationships important in glaucoma decision making.  This course uses cases to demonstrate the role of OCT in revealing angle anatomy in angle closure, angle recession, iridotomy and iridoplasty management decisions.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-04
Gregory DeNaeyer

Comprehensive Contact Lens Management of the Keratoconus Patient


This course is a comprehensive review of the evaluation and contact lens management of the keratoconus patient. The participant will learn how to choose and evaluate lens designs that will maximize success for their keratoconus patients.
2 hours


Room 124 A-B

BV-03
Catherine Heyman

Evaluation and Management of Special Populations


This course provides the primary care optometrist with the information needed to increase their comfort level in providing vision care for individuals with special needs. Additionally, information is given about other professionals involved in the treatment of persons with special needs.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-04
David Kirschen

Fixation Disparity - A Useful Clinical Measurement In The Treatment Of Binocular Vision Anomalies


Fixation disparity analysis has long been the diamond in the rough in optometry for treating patients with minimal binocular dysfunctions.  Using rapid techniques and inexpensive equipment, it is possible to diagnose and determine what therapy is best to alleviate the patient’s symptoms.

1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-03
Imran Khan

Psychosocial Adaptation, Task Adjustment, and Functional Success in Low Vision Rehabilitation: A Low Vision Portrait of Claude Monet


Psychosocial adaption and task adjustment are central to patient management in low vision rehabilitation, as are concepts of clinical versus functional success. These concepts are illustrated by artists, like Monet, who suffered visual impairment, and can be used to change the way we approach low vision rehabilitation and patient care in general.
1 hour


Room 228

PH-01
Valerie Wren

ODs Instrumental in Fall Prevention


ODs are uniquely positioned to assess fall risk and can be impactful on fall prevention.  Falls in the elderly are associated with hip fractures and are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury. This course will teach validated tools to assess fall risk and will emphasize referral models to minimize risk and help seniors maintain independence.
1 hour


Room 224 A

WK-02
Kelly Thompson, Matthew Hochwalt

Gonioscopy and Identification of Normal and Abnormal Angle Structures


Participants become proficient in the gonioscopic technique with three and four mirror lenses. They learn to identify angle structures on real patients and document their findings. Images of normal and abnormal angles are reviewed. Indications for evaluation, referral criteria and management of angle closure are covered.  
2 hours


3:00 PM 


Room 122 A-C

NO-03
Kelly Malloy

The Value of Visual Fields


This course discusses the importance of various types of visual field assessment and the accurate interpretation of visual fields in differentiating causes of vision loss. A case-based approach discusses organic vs. non-organic vision loss, glaucomatous vs. non-glaucomatous vision loss, and anatomic localization of neurologic vision loss.
2 hours CEE


Room 221 A-C

PS-03
Mohammad Rafieetary

Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer: Beyond Normative Data


There are many anatomic and pathologic conditions other than glaucoma that influence the thickness and condition of the nerve fiber layer. Practitioners who focus solely on analyzed data might overlook these factors. This lecture covers the pros and cons of NFL scanning and the conditions that influence testing results.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

PH-02
Timothy Wingert

The Public Health Issue of Children’s Vision Problems


Participants will understand what to consider given the prevalence of children’s vision problems, the relative costs of vision screenings versus comprehensive eye examinations, the experiences of states with requirements for comprehensive eye examinations, and a look toward future trends with federal legislation and the Affordable Care Act.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-04
Ian Bailey, Jonathan Jackson

Testing Patients With Very Low Vision


Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and visual field tests help predict functional abilities. In patients with very low vision, different test materials and procedures are required. We have new systematic approaches for testing low VA (to 20/16000), CS with very large targets, functional fields and the effects of illumination.
1 hour


Room 228

GO-05
Meredith Whiteside, Marlena Chu

Geriatric Eye Care on the Go: Providing Care in Nontraditional Settings


With an increasingly aged population, optometrists may need to provide care in nontraditional settings such as a home or a skilled nursing center. This lecture reviews the need for care and evidence based clinical care considerations. Examples of patient care will highlight needed equipment, alternative techniques and tips to maximize vision.
1 hour


Room 224 B

WK-04
Eli Peli

Fitting Peripheral Prisms for Hemianopia


This workshop provides hands-on experience in fitting and ordering peripheral prisms.  Participants gain experience in training patients in the use of these prisms.  Hemianopic volunteer subjects enable the participants to observe visual field expansion using confrontation field and tangent screen testing.
2 hours


4:00 PM



North Ballroom D

PS-04
Diana Shechtman

Challenging Cases of Concomitant Glaucoma and Retinal Disease: Reading Between the Microns


We are often faced with a host of disease processes ranging from glaucoma to retinal. When concomitant cases present, they can pose challenges in evaluation and management. This course emphasizes such challenges using case examples.  In addition, a brief discussion of new diagnostic modalities and management protocol is included.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

GL-04
David Hicks

Visual Fields in Glaucoma


Diagnosing glaucoma remains in the forefront of optometric practice.  Although the OCT and other imaging techniques have aided in this effort, visual field analysis remains the standard of care.  It is paramount to understand how visual fields are tested, analyzed, and judged for progression to properly diagnose and manage glaucoma.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-05
Beth Kinoshita, Meredith Jansen

Contact Lens Assessment in Youth - Transition from Research to Practice


Evidence based clinical practice improves the management of patient care, from examination procedures to methods of patient education. This course reviews research related to contact lens complications and summarizes the results of the contact lens safely results for possible implications in changes in standard of care in general practice.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-06
Timothy Hug

Strabismus and Motility Disorders


EOM alignment and motility evaluation are essential components of the eye exam.  What happens when the clinician discovers something?  This course reviews strabismus and motility disorders,and their components and treatment options. Both adult and pediatric implications are discussed.
1 hour


Room 228

AS-03
Donald Korb

A New Paradigm for Dry Eye: The Academic to the Pragmatic


MGD is the leading cause of dry eye. This course covers a new model for the Dry Eye Cascade, including proposed mechanisms for how hyposecretory MGD cascades into anatomical and atrophic changes of the ocular surface and adnexa. Clinical treatment and prevention are also addressed.
1 hour

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

8:00 AM


North Ballroom D

PS-05
Pravin Dugel

What's New in Retina?


This lecture covers recent significant advances in the management of retinal disease, focusing on new products recently on or soon to be on the market. The physiology of retina diseases and new strategies to treat patients is discussed.  Drugs covered include Eylea, as well as other drugs that are in clinical trials.
2 hours


Room 221 A-C

GL-05
Michael Sullivan-Mee

The Cornea, the Optic Nerve and Glaucoma: What Gives ?


Corneal biomechanical properties have long been known to impact measurement of intraocular pressure. But the awareness that these factors might reflect glaucoma susceptibility independent of IOP is relatively new. This course will discuss how biomechanical characteristics of the anterior and posterior segment may aid glaucoma management.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

AS-04
Long Tran

Clinical Management of Corneal Dystrophies and Degenerations


This course highlights corneal dystrophies and degenerations commonly encountered in practice. An understanding of the pathogenesis and manifestation of these conditions may shed the mystique in their management. Options such as bandage contact lenses, laser phototherapeutic keratectomy, and novel corneal transplant techniques are discussed.
1 hour


Room 124 A-B

OP-03
Megan Hunter, Michelle Marciniak

Ocular Manifestations of Systemic Diseases and Medications


This course discusses some common systemic diseases, the medications used to treat them, and the effects both the diseases and the medications may have on the eyes.  Indicated adjunctive testing is reviewed.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

NO-04
Denise Goodwin

Top 5 Pitfalls in Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease


Because the visual system interacts with so many areas of the brain, optometrists will see patients with neuro-ophthalmic disorders. Recognizing patterns will result in timely and cost effective management of these patients. Here, clinical cases in which mistakes were made illustrate problems that may occur while managing neuro-ophthalmic cases.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-05
Khadija Shahid

The Psychology of Vision Loss: Psychosocial Impact and Management Strategies


The impact of vision loss is largely related to individual psychological manifestations, either as a direct result or a mitigating factor. Understanding and applying basic psychotherapy techniques can minimize associated psychological effects of vision loss and the impact on quality of life for patients and family members.
1 hour


Room 224 B

WK-05
Diane Adamczyk

Public Speaking Workshop


This workshop provides a foundation to the development of various skills necessary to become an effective public speaker.  Active participation from the attendees is an important component of the workshop.  Constructive feedback on how to improve and develop public speaking skills will be given to the attendees, who will do a brief presentation.  
3 hours


9:00 AM


Room 221 A-C

NO-05
Brad Sutton

Papillledema vs. Pseudopapilledema: Are They Swollen or Are They Not?


Distinguishing between papilledema and optic nerve drusen can be a significant challenge for clinicians. The etiology, diagnosis, and management of papilledema and optic nerve head drusen are discussed in detail.

1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-06
Annie Chang, Dawn Lam

GP Primer


For the every day practitioner, fitting GP lenses may seem intimidating; however, there is a niche of patients where GP lenses are the best refractive option(ex: aphakics, degenerative myopes, and high astigmats). This course reviews the basics of GP lens fitting, discusses trouble-shooting tips,and reviews fluorescein patterns via video clips.
1 hour


Room 124 A-B

OP-04
A. Paul Chous

The Top 5 Nutritional Supplements For Diabetic Retinopathy


This course presents the scientific rationale for and evidence supporting the use of specific supplements in the prevention and management of diabetic retinopathy.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-07
Marie Bodack

AD(H)D, ASD, SID? What Do Those Initials Mean to Children and ODs?


This course presents 3 commonly encountered psychological diagnoses: attention deficit, autsim spectrum and sensory integration disorders. Emphasis is on reviewing the characteristics, including ocular findings, of each disorder and discusses both optometric, and non-optometric tests and treatments.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-06
Ana Perez

Managing Peripheral Field Loss from Fitting to Training


Peripheral field defects cause functional disabilities. Treatment options for overall peripheral constrictions and homonymous hemianopsias are discussed. Specifics of prescribing, fitting, and training are addressed, with an emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to ensure an in-office prescription transfer into a real-world setting.
1 hour


Room 224 A

WK-06
Caroline Pate, Elizabeth Steele

Getting a Better View of the Fundus


In this hands-on workshop, attendees become familiar with various options of contact and non-contact lenses for biomicroscopy and their uses in clinical practice.  Patient preparation, procedure and interpretation of the fundus examination are covered.  Standards of care are addressed and clinical pearls are provided.
2 hours


10:00 AM


North Ballroom B-C

SD-07
Tony Adams, Dean VanNasdale, Leo Carney, Donald Mutti, Jason Nichols, Austin Roorda

OVS Presents - Ocular Disease: The Revolution in Clinical Imaging in the Eye


This 2-hour course, led by OVS Editor-in-Chief (Tony Adams) brings authors and guest editors debating in expert panels. The interactions focus on recent discoveries related to clinical imaging and its recent technological developments and applications from front (tears/cornea) to back of the human eye (retina and optic nerve).
2 hours


North Ballroom D

GL-06
Thomas Freddo

A Clinical Overview of the Secondary Open-Angle Glaucomas


This lecture provides a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, management and a contemporary understanding of the pathophysiology of the secondary open-angle glaucomas. Sub-sets to be considered include:  Secondary to Iritis   Phacolytic  Ghost cell  Steroid-induced  Pigmentary glaucoma  Exfoliative glaucoma  
2 hours CEE


Room 122 A-C

GO-06
Mark Swanson, Mindy Fain

An Introduction to Interdisciplinary Care of the Complex Older Adult


Interdisciplinary care is a new model of caring for the complex older adult patient. Quality of care and reimbursement organizations are advancing this model. This lecture will provide optometrists with an introduction to interdisciplinary care and give case examples of how optometry functions within and in some cases leads the care team.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

GO-07
Albert Woods, Bi Hua

Visual Electrodiagnostics: Clinical Cases in Retinal and Neuro-Ocular Disorders


With the development of multifocal electrodiagnostic techniques it is now possible to record responses from localized areas of the retina and visual field. Using case studies, the indications for visual electrodiagnostic testing, including traditional electroretinography and visual evoked potentials, and newer multifocal techniques are presented.
2 hours


Room 222 A-C

CL-07
Mark Andre, Kelvin So

A Comprehensive System for Managing Your Keratoconus Patients with Contact Lenses


Contact lens options for our Keratoconus patients include GP lenses, custom soft lenses, scleral lenses, and hybrid lenses. Combined that with the various forms and stages of Keratoconus and choosing the appropriate lens can be intimidating. We will demonstrate our system for determining a contact lens  management plan for these complex cases.
2 hours


Room 124 A-B

NO-06
Kelly Thomann, Nancy Wong

Optic Nerve Jeopardy!


The course utilizes the jeopardy format to provide an interactive lecture on optic nerve conditions. Clinical characterization of optic nerve anomalies, specifically congenital vs. acquired etiologies, is emphasized.  In addition, patho-physiologic correlates are discussed along with treatment and management modalities.
 2 hours CEE


Room 226 A-C

BV-08
Susan Cotter, Angela Chen

Amblyopia Treatment Strategies: The Latest & Greatest


An updated evidence-based approach for amblyopia management is provided for the busy clinician. Treatment guidelines and clinical pearls for optical correction, patching, atropine penalization, and active vision therapy are provided for patients of different ages with varying degrees of amblyopia.
2 hours


Room 227 A-C

PM-01
Richard Soden

Coding and Billing Low Vision Rehabilitation Services


This course will review the basic concepts needed to properly bill and code low vision services. The appropriate use of ICD-9 and CPT codes for patients requiring low vision rehabilitation will be presented. Finally, the use of the rehabilitation codes will be overviewed.
2 hours


11:00 AM


Room 122 A-C

PO-01
Steven Ferrucci

Co-Managing Vitreal Injections


This course reviews the procedure of intravitreal injections, the potential side effects and pitfalls of intravitreal injections, and the latest uses of these agents, most notably the anti-VEGF agents.
1 hour


Room 224 B

WK-07
Craig Woods, Sharon Ann Bentley, Mark Bullimore

Would You Like to Become a Reviewer for a Journal?


This course is intended for those who have not reviewed a manuscript for a journal or consider themselves a novice. It covers the reasons for peer review and how to do it. Being a peer reviewer for a journal allows you to expand your knowledge and make a key contribution to the development of your profession and the science of optometry.
1 hour


1:30 PM


North Ballroom B-C

OP-05
Jeffrey Varanelli, Nicholas Colatrella

Practical Pharmacology: Our Favorite Medications


This one hour lecture discusses the presenters preferred medications in several ophthalmic and systemic classes.  We review current treatment strategies and recommendations and use case studies and photos to illustrate key points.   Choices are based upon efficacy, safety, and ease of use among other factors.
1 hour


North Ballroom D

PS-06
Diana Shechtman

Holes: Hold 'em or Fold 'em


This lecture uses case presentations to illustrate macular and retinal holes.  Understanding of the clinical presentation and the role of the vitreal-retinal interface are crucial for proper diagnosis/management. Emphasis is on appropriate and timely referral.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

AS-05
Greg Caldwell

Ocular Manifestations and Treatment of Allergic Disorders


Ocular allergies manifest themselves through a variety of changes to the palbebral and bulbar conjunctiva. This course reviews the variety of presentations and discusses the lastest pharmaceutical options.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-08
Jeffrey Sonsino, Muriel Schornack

The Trouble with Scleral Lenses: What to do When Things go Wrong


Scleral lenses have become a safe and effective means of correction for those with irregular corneas and severe dry eyes.  Even with diagnostic lens fitting, scleral lenses present challenges to even the best corneal lens fitter.  We discuss solutions to common troubleshooting problems such as poor wetting, poor comfort, and dislodging lenses.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-09
Richard London

Binocular Anomalies Resulting From Pathological Causes: Thyroid Myopathy, Myasthenia, Multiple Sclerosis


This course presents a diagnostic approach to uncovering some of the pathologies that masquerade as binocular vision problems. Thyroid myopathy, myasthenia and multiple sclerosis are covered with updated video demonstrations of various patient presentations and testing techniques.
2 hours CEE


Room 227 A-C

SD-08
Sherrol Reynolds

Hematological Disorders: Ocular Changes That May Indicate an Underlying Systemic Condition


Hematological disorders encompass a wide spectrum of conditions that can present with ocular involvement. The ocular changes may be the initial indication of underlying disease. This presentation uses various cases to discuss findings of anemia, sickle cell, lymphoma and leukemia as well as the latest management and treatment options.
1 hour


Room 228

PM-02
Robert Dister, Michael Harris

How NOT to be sued for Malpractice


Even excellent doctors may be sued for negligence. This course explores the legal bases of malpractice lawsuits, how doctors can minimize the chance of being sued, and what can be done to maximize the chances of winning in court.
1 hour


Room 224 A

WK-08
Meredith Whiteside, Nimesh Patel, John Shan

Advanced Examination of the Retina: Scleral Indentation and Retinal 3-Mirror


Advanced funduscopic techniques of scleral indentation and retinal 3-mirror are valuable for retinal evaluation. This workshop provides hands-on experience with participants dilating one eye and practicing these techniques on each other. Instructional aides include video and teaching tubes. Interpretation of common retinal findings are reviewed.
2 hours


Room 224 B

WK-08
Sherry Bass, Jerome Sherman

Hi-Tech Diagnostic Procedures In The Detection & Management Of Glaucoma And Retinal Disease


This workshop provides hands-on experience using several exciting technologies: Cirrus SD-OCT, Spectralis SD-OCT with autofluorescent imaging, Optos  with panoramic viewing, Annidis Multiple Spectral Imager(MSI)for retinal/choroidal assessment and blood flow and the Ocular Response Analyzer(ORA) for corneal biochemical properties and IOP.      
3 hours


2:30 PM


North Ballroom B-C

GO-09
David Geffen, Paul Karpecki

New Technology Rapid-Fire Session


Patients research topics on the Internet more than ever. This program insures that the participant can answer any of his/her questions related to current and imminent eye care technologies! It is a fast-paced peek into new and future technologies including new diagnostic tests, therapeutics, drug delivery systems, and procedures.
2 hours CEE


North Ballroom D

GL-08
Leonid Skorin

ALT, SLT, LPI, ECP: Glaucoma Laser Alphabet Soup


This course will introduce the common glaucoma laser treatments used in a clinical and surgical setting.  The indications, co-management and potential complications will be reviewed for each glaucoma laser procedure.  The presenter routinely performs each of these laser procedures.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

GO-10
Brian Hall

Systemic Management of Ocular Disorders


This course provides an overview and insight into a number of ocular conditions with a focus on systemic medications and their use in managing these conditions.  Infectious, allergic and inflammatory disorders, age related macular degeneration, glaucoma and neurogenic ocular conditions will all be covered.
2 hours


Room 222 A-C

CL-09
Luigina Sorbara

Case Studies: Fitting Keratoconus Patients with the Use of VKE


This course examines the use of video-keratoscopy, in fitting corneal contact lenses to four keratoconic patients (KC). Each of the four cases has been selected to represent a type of cone and range in severity from mild to severe.  From each topographic map data needed to fit CL's will be extracted and related to the type of KC.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-07
Richard Brilliant

The Nuts and Bolts of Prescribing for Near: Microscopes, Magnifiers, and Telemicroscopes


This lecture presents the basic concepts, from a clinical perspective, used in evaluating and prescribing low vision devices for near work.  It will be reinforced by basic optical principles along with case presentations at the end to tie in these principles.
2 hours


Room 228

GO-11
Stuart Richer

Molecular Medicine, Epigenetics and Eye Care


Spontaneous remissions from age related macular degeneration (AMD) suggest the human retina has large regenerative capacity, even in advanced age. Resveratrol combined with other small molecules has been found, sometimes within days, to be clinically beneficial in otherwise non-responsive octogenarians afflicted by AMD, without medical options.
1 hour


3:30 PM


North Ballroom D

GL-09
Murray Fingeret

New Horizons in Glaucoma


Recent advances in diagnostic technologies and therapeutic modalities have altered how glaucoma is diagnosed and managed. This lecture reviews some of the new technologies, medications and philosophies and how they impact on glaucoma care.
2 hours


Room 122 A-C

SD-09
Joseph Pizzimenti, Carlo Pelino

Review of Systems--Live and Unplugged!


The eye does not exist in isolation, but is a mirror of systemic health. Indeed, the eye is the only part of the body where neurological and vascular tissues can be viewed directly. This course uses topical discussion and clinical cases to illustrate the eye-body connection.
2 hours


Room 222 A-C

CL-10
Susan Gromacki, Michael Ward

Understanding Contemporary Contact Lens Care Products


The past few years have brought remarkable technological advancements in contact lens materials, designs, and care.  This lecture presents the state of contact lens care today:  solution formulations; workings of the US FDA; pathogenesis of contact lens-related eye infection; biofilms; compliance; research; and what is planned for the future.
2 hours


Room 124 A-B

GO-13
Diane Adamczyk

Headaches: What Every Clinician Needs to Know


Headaches are a common clinical presentation to the eye care practitioner.    Important aspects of the history, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and management of these patients will be discussed.
2 hours CEE


Room 226 A-C

BV-10
Kia Eldred, Heather Anderson

Management of Down Syndrome: A 21st Century Approach


We are living in an era of new research and management for medical and visual needs of persons with Down syndrome.  Presenters discuss new treatment options for cognitive improvement and current research.  Research findings of accommodative dysfunction are reviewed, including a discussion of clinical management techniques for these patients.
1 hour


Room 228

PH-05
Rachel Coulter

Providing Vision Examinations to Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder- Tools and Strategies to Provide High Quality Care


Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder often have unmet needs for vision care. This course will integrate information from research, an interdisciplinary clinical model, and clinical experience to describe supports and modifications for examination procedures. Case presentations and video clips will illustrate real-world applications.
1 hour


4:30 PM


North Ballroom D

PS-07
Jerome Sherman

Panoramic Fundus Autofluorescence: Clinical Applications and Limitations


Fundus Autofluorescence (FAF) is a novel, non-invasive imaging method that yields abnormalities that are often invisible to ophthalmoscopy and standard fundus photography. It allows mapping of lipofuscin distribution in the outer retina which are crucial findings in complex retinal diseases. FAF, however, is limited to outer retinal disorders.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

GO-14
Sunny Sanders, Brett Larson

Ocular Prosthetics in the Optometric Practice


This course presents evolution of this specialty and how it fits into optometry. The various prosthetic devices and their applications are discussed. Routine care and management of the patient is outlined. Incorporation into practice is discussed. Fitting and creation of the devices demonstrated.  Case management examples are showcased.    
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-11
Marcela Frazier

Visual Consequences of Common (And not so Common) Pediatric Conditions: Things You Don’t Want to Miss!


Many pediatric systemic conditions can have visual sequelae.   It is very important to know the possible visual consequences and manifestations systemic diseases to better diagnose and manage them.  Systemic conditions such as chromosomal anomalies, metabolic diseases, connective tissue disorders and infectious disease are reviewed.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-08
Eli Peli

In and On the Eye Low Vision Telescopes


Prior and current technologies are reviewed. A discussion is presented of advantages and disadvantages in terms of field-of-view, interactions vestibular system, light economy, binocular function, and use in mobility.  The result of clinical trials and other studies are critically reviewed. Patient selection process is explained
1 hour

Friday, October 27th, 2012

10:00AM


North Ballroom B-C

PS-08
Pravin Dugel

Retinal Diseases That You Do Not Want To Miss


This lecture presents both common and uncommon retinal diseases that can have potentially severe consequences to the patient if left undetected. This is a very interactive and fast-moving session in which diseases will be presented as unknowns.
2 hours


North Ballroom D

GL-10
Blair Lonsberry, John Flanagan

Imaging of the Optic Nerve and Retina


The following interactive course will review the latest imaging equipment and their application in the diagnosis, treatment and management of glaucoma and other ocular diseases. Case examples will highlight the capabilities and application of these imaging technologies, and to enhance the participant?s experience.
2 hours CEE


Room 221 A-C

GO-15
Charles Wormington

Genetics & Family History: The Clinical Essentials


This course covers the major categories of genetic diseases.  It covers the use of the family history as a genetic screening tool, how to draw a three-generation pedigree, how to identify the inheritance patterns from the family pedigree, and then it illustrates this with various case studies.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-11
Randy Kojima, Patrick Caroline

The Practical Application of Corneal Topography in Clinical Practice


Throughout this lecture we will describe new techniques for the interpretation of axial, tangential, elevation, sag and wavefront maps to aid in disease detection and the fitting of corneal, scleral and custom SCL designs.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-12
T. Rowan Candy

The Visual Experience of the Young Hyperope: Emmetropization and Accommodation


Young hyperopes are at risk for strabismus and amblyopia.  Their retinal image quality and visual experience are dependent on their accommodative performance.  This course reviews the evidence regarding normal and abnormal emmetropization and accommodative performance in infants and young children in the context of clinical assessment and care.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-09
Robert Greer

Telescopes: Magnification and Beyond


The prescribing of telescopes to those with low vision entails more than just understanding magnification. This course discusses the optical characteristics of Galilean and Keplerian telescopes that determines field of view and image brightness. The course will also shed light on the effects of focusing for near and/or refractive errors.
1 hour


Room 224 A

WK-10
Walter Potaznick, Irwin Shwom

Everything You Wanted to Know about Punctal Occlusion


Punctal Plugs are a key adjunctive therapy in the relief of dry eye. This workshop trains each practitioner to insert diagnostic collagen and semi-permanent plugs. New as well as conventional plug designs are available for hands-on use. Each practitioner hones their chair-side skills in the application of these devices.
2 hours


Room 224 B

WK-10
Raymond Chu

Using Technology and Multi-media for effective presentations


Lectures are often criticized for their passive learning style and inability of the instructor to gauge student understanding. Through appropriate instruction design, lectures are more active and engaging. Attendees learn best practices in designing presentations, using audience response systems and incorporating multimedia.
2 hours


11:00 AM


Room 221 A-C

PS-10
Todd Peabody, Kimberly Kohne

Evidence Based Retinal Care


Evidence based care is best practice.  Clinical studies directly impact how we care for patients. This course discusses the impact of recent studies, particularly those involving retinal pathology. These studies include but are not limited to SCORE, Copernicus, VIEW, ACCORD, BRAVO, CRUISE, CATT, and AREDS2.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-12
Lynette Johns

Therapeutic Contact Lens Use in Ocular Surface Disease


Applying contact lenses on severe dry eyes seems counterintuitive.  Soft contact lenses and scleral devices can be very effective in the treatment and management of severe ocular surface disease.  Case reports highlight clinical applications of both modalities.  We explore the limitations of lenses and scleral devices.    
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-13
Marie Bodack

Eye Owies: How to Treat Pediatric Anterior Segment Disorders


This course uses case examples to review a variety of pediatric anterior segment disorders. Emphasis is on appropriate diagnosis, treatment and management of the conditions, including a review of FDA recommended dosing for commonly prescribed topical ophthalmic medications. The course  also discusses dosing of oral medications.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-10
Bhavani Iyer

Assessing Central Scotomas: Then and Now.


Scotoma assessment is an important component of a low vision assessment. This course provides a review of different methods of assessment from the past to the present. A comparison is presented of the different microperimetry methods- SLO, MP1,the new MAIA and manual alternatives.  Billing strategies are also presented.
1 hour


2:00 PM


North Ballroom B-C

NO-08
Richard Madonna, Patricia Modica

Optic Neuropathy Grand Rounds: Differentiating Glaucomatous vs. Non-Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy


Using a series of case presentations, this course provides the practitioner with the skills to evaluate patients with optic neuropathies and to distinguish those with glaucoma from those with non-glaucomatous etiologies.
2 hours CEE


North Ballroom D

SD-10
Tammy Than

Lab Testing: Its Role in Diagnosing and Managing Ocular Disease


The course provides a clinical review of tests applicable to optometry, how to obtain test samples, and how to interpret the results to be better diagnose and manage ocular pathology and systemic diseases that affect the eye.
2 hours CEE


Room 121 A-C

AS-07
Long Tran, Timothy Edrington

Keratoconus: New Advancements in Contact Lenses & Surgical Procedures


This course reviews the diagnosis and management of keratoconus, including up-to-date contact lens and surgical options. Novel lens designs, such as scleral and silicone hydrogel contact lenses are discussed along with innovative surgical procedures such as corneal collagen cross-linking with riboflavin and selective corneal keratoplasty.
1 hour


Room 122 A-C

SD-11
Leonid Skorin

Sinusitis: Nothing To Sneeze At


This course reviews sinusitis.  Emphasis is on diagnosis and treatment of sinusitis and orbital disease.  Clinical cases are presented.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

OP-06
Greg Caldwell

Oral Pharmaceutical Agents for the Treatment of Anterior Segment Pathologies


This course reviews the use of oral medications in eyecare. Agents discussed include oral antibiotics,  antivirals, analgesics and narcotics.  Practical information regarding dosing information, adverse reactions, and pregnancy guidelines are covered.
2 hours


Room 222 A-C

CL-13
Thomas Quinn

The Decision-Making Process for Multifocal Contact Lens Prescribing


Today's wide array of multifocal contact lens options offer much promise for the presbyopic contact lens wearer.  Learn a methodical approach to matching lens design to patient needs and ocular characteristics.
2 hours


Room 124 A-B

GL-11
Andrew Mick

The Trabecular Meshwork: Its Role in Glaucoma Pathogenesis and as a Target of Therapy


The trabecular meshwork and Schlemm''''s canal play important roles in the normal outflow of aqueous. But in glaucoma, abnormalities may affect outflow and increase the intraocular pressure. The unique structure and function of these tissues will be reviewed with emphasis on glaucoma pathophysiology and mechanisms of action of common therapies.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-14
Kelly Frantz

Management of Accommodative Disorders


This lecture reviews diagnosis of common accommodative disorders and discusses management of these conditions, including use of added plus lenses. In addition, efficacy, expected duration, and methods of vision therapy for accommodative disorders are presented.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

GO-16
Jerry Rapp

Nutritional and Biochemical Implications in Systemic Disease


This course discusses the importance of nutritional factors in the etiology of heart disease, hypertension and diabetes; the ways in which nutrition may act synergistically with genetic tendencies to enhance the expression of disease; and how to modify one's diet and other lifestyle characteristics to decrease the risk of disease.
2 hours


Room 224 A

WK-11
J. Bruce Baldwin, Jason Jedlicka, Melissa Barnett, Lynette Johns

Basics of Scleral Contact Lens Fitting: It's As Easy As 1-2-3


This workshop, designed for participants with limited experience fitting scleral lenses, starts with a brief presentation on the basics of lens design and fitting principles. Instructors are members of the Scleral Lens Education Society and provide hands on fitting experience using lenses from several lens companies.
2 hours


3:00 PM


Room 122 A-C

PS-12
Ava Bittner, Gislin Dagnelie

Beyond the Amsler Grid: Current Trends in Vision Self-Monitoring for AMD


The course reviews the importance of the early detection of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). The current trends in methods for vision monitoring by AMD patients is discussed, as well as the role of optometrists in fostering patient education and facilitating follow up after the onset of AMD
1 hour


Room 124 A-B

GO-17
Michael Cymbor

HD OCT Case Presentations: From Cornea to Retina


As optometrists continue to immerse themselves in medical eye care, certain diagnostic procedures are becoming more common. This class will show the appropriate application of HD OCT and will demonstrate how important HD OCT has become in diagnosing ocular disease from the cornea to the retina.
2 hours


Room 226 A-C

BV-15
Don Lyon

Incorporating Vision Therapy into Amblyopia Treatment


The treatment of amblyopia should go beyond visual acuity, since much more is affected. Vision therapy with patching enables the patient to improve in accommodation, suppression and vergence. This course defines which patients vision therapy would work best for and reviews the core components of the active therapy program.
1 hour


Room 224 B

WK-12
Andrew Rixon, Scott Ensor, John Neal

Injectable Medications in Primary Eyecare


This workshop provides hands on administration of periocular injection techniques commonly utilized by the primary eyecare practitioner. It is taught by practitioners who employ these techniques on a routine basis in the daily clinic setting. There are four stations; subconjunctival, intralesional, intravenous, and intravitreal (video).
3 hours


4:00 PM


North Ballroom B-C

SD-12
William Townsend

Thyroid Disease and the Eye: What We Must Know


Thyroid disease (TD) has potentially serious effects on the visual system. Optometrists can recognize ocular & systemic signs/symptoms of TD. This presentation addresses the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the thyroid gland & tests used to diagnose TD. Finally, optometric management of ocular complications of thyroid disease is discussed.
2 hours


North Ballroom D

RS-01
Susan Gromacki, David Geffen

Quality of Life in LASIK and PRK: New Pre- and Post-operative Patient Management Strategies


The United States FDA recently launched a study to examine the impact on quality of life from LASIK.  We discuss this study as well as the presenters'''' own research on predictive measures of PRK success.  We also present the latest advances in co-managing LASIK and PRK with both pharmaceutical and contact lens applications.
2 hours CEE


Room 221 A-C

PS-11
William Jones

Epiretinal Membranes - What Are They All About?


The course covers the causes of epiretinal membrane formation in great detail with numerous OCT and fundus images. There is discussion of the time sequence to membrane formation and of the possible consequences of ERM formation; intraretinal separation, foveal/macular distortion, and macular hole formation.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-15
Dennis Burger

Practical Applications: Contact Lenses For Kids


The use of contact lenses for pediatric conditions will be discussed. Clinical indications for contact lenses include: esotropia, exotropia, nystagmus, myopia control, aphakia, as well as opaque lenses for amblyopia, aniridia, and albinism. One half the lecture will cover pediatric examination and lens fitting techniques.
2 hours


Room 226 A-C

PO-02
Maynard Pohl

Perioperative Management of the Corneal Transplant Patient


This course reviews the newest techniques in corneal transplant, particularly anterior and posterior lamellar keratoplasties, and keratoprostheses. The indications for each of these procedures and how to effectively comanage such patients with skilled corneal specialists is discussed.
2 hours


Room 227 A-C

LV-11
Michael Fischer, William O'Connell

Low Vision Technology Update 2012: Computer, Video and More


This course reviews the latest options for low vision patients in computer accessibility, video magnification, and other adaptive technology devices. A multimedia presentation is utilized to better demonstrate the latest developments in computers (screen magnification, speech input and output), CCTVs, portable devices, smart phones, and more.
1 hour


5:00 PM


Room 221 A-C

SD-13
Barbara Caffery

Ocular Inflammation and Autoimmunity


Those red eyes, murky anterior chambers and inflamed retinas may  have a systemic origin. This course reviews the pathophysiology of the systemic autoimmune diseases that affect the eye. Clinical examples are used to demonstrate the essential history questions, differential diagnosis, and lab testing that are required to make these tough diagnoses.
1 hour


Room 124 A-B

GO-20
Michael McGovern, Neera Kapoor

Optometric Examination and Management of Patients with Balance Disorders


Dizziness and balance problems are some of the most commonly reported complaints in medicine. This course provides an overview of the neurophysiology of balance and the more common pathologies causing balance problems. A comprehensive review of the proper evaluation and management of these patients is provided.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

GO-21
Dennis Fong

Visual Ergonomic Solutions for Today's Technology User


Today's technology savvy user utilizes multiple screens, laptops, pad devices, smart phones, e-Books, and digital cameras, creating challenging visual demands in our daily lives.  This course explores the detail required to fully assess the patient's environment and visual demands, and the specialty lenses available to provide an optimal solution.
1 hour


Room 224 A

WK-14
Scientific Program Committee

Abstract Writing Workshop

Learn about how to create a successful Scientific Program submission.
1 hour

 

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

8:00 AM


North Ballroom B-C

PS-13
Khadija S. Shahid, Ben Szirth

Fundus Autofluorescence and High Resolution OCT Technology for Novel Detection of Vision Threatening Disease


Advances in imaging technology enable more sensitive and accurate detection of vision threatening disease. Fundus Auto Fluorescence  measures lipofuscin, a biomarker of aging and some pathologies. Integration of high resolution (HR-) OCT, including HR-OCT registration and color fundus photo overlay, enables precise analysis of the posterior pole.
1 hour


North Ballroom D

OP-07
Ron Melton, Randall Thomas

Current Trends in Medical Management


Treatment strategies and therapeutic agents continually change for a variety of ocular conditions. This course addresses some of the advances in therapeutic options for acute and chronic ocular diseases. Relevant drug classes, latest information, clinical application of pharmaceuticals are reviewed.
2 hours CEE


Room 121 A-C

AS-08
Alan Kwok

Autologous Serum Eye Drops: Why and When to Use


In addition to providing necessary lubrication to the ocular surface, tears also serve as a vehicle for important growth factors and proteins essential in corneal homeostasis. Autologous serum tears contain many similar nutrients and are often used in many ocular surface diseases.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

GO-22
Jeffrey Anshel

Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Visual Health And the Prevention/Management of Ocular Disorders


Most practitioners are aware of the popularity of Omega-3 supplements and their effectiveness in treating dry eye. This course sorts out the confusion regarding essential fatty acids and discusses the science behind the various forms of this very popular and effective nutritional agent and it's role in ocular health.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

PM-03
Mark Hamilton

18 Practice Management and Contact Lens Clinical Tips You Can Do In Your Office Right Now


Most practitioners sit through hours of courses each year looking for one or two "pearls of wisdom" they can actually use in their practices. Here are 12 pearls presented in a lively, interactive fashion that can be implemented in practice immediately.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-16
Nadine Girgis, James Kundart

The Whiter, Brighter Pupil-Leukocoria in Children


Leukocoria, when found in children, is a great cause for concern. This course reviews the major differentials which need to be reviewed when a patient presents with this important sign.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-12
Karen Squier, Vladimir Yevseyenkov

Acquired Brain Injury: Functional vs Behavioral Approach to Rehabilitation


Acquired brain injury is an increasingly common condition in vision rehabilitation. The rehabilitation optometrist is a key member in the rehabilitation of patients with ABI and is integral in coordinating and  implementing rehabilitation plans. Functional and behavioral approaches to vision rehabilitation of patients with ABI will be compared.
2 hours


Room 228

PH-06
Matthew Pearce

Knowledge Is Not a Cure: Health Education Basics for Your Practice


As primary care providers, optometrists educate their patients on how their behaviors impact their health. Optometrists are often not trained in health education and behavior change theory. This course introduces health education concepts so that optometrists can be better prepared to encourage and support behavior change in their patients.
1 hour


Room 224 B

WK-15
Sunny Sanders, Dawn Lam

Ocular Prosthetics Workshop


This workshop provides the skills to maintain, modify and fit ocular prosthetic devices.  Hands-on procedures include contact lens tinting, prosthetic eye re-surfacing and polishing, modifications and fitting procedures for reform and shell eyes as well as corneal and soft prosthetic lenses. Patient cases and management techniques are presented.    
3 hours


9:00 AM


North Ballroom B-C

GL-12
Edward Chu

Under Pressure: Ocular Perfusion, Nocturnal IOP and Eye Disease


Glaucoma patients with disease progression, despite well-controlled IOPs, present a management dilemma. In addition to IOP, poor ocular perfusion can potentially lead to acute or chronic ischemic nerve damage. Nocturnal hypotension in combination with over-night IOP spikes can place susceptible patients at increased risk for glaucomatous damage.
1 hour


Room 121 A-C

WK-16
Susan Cotter

Presentation Tips for a Tip-Top Lecture


A good lecturer is made, not born. Key steps to designing and delivering an effective presentation and tips on how to enhance your powerpoint slide design and develop skills that will ensure that your audience stays awake and receives your intended message are presented.
2 hours


Room 221 A-C

NO-10
Mika Moy, Christine Wilmer
Pearls, Trick Questions and Head Scratchers: Cases in Neuro-optometry

Neuro-optometric cases can pose diagnostic challenges.  Optometrists are key players in the health care team and must make appropriate decisions around resource management, referral and utilization of neuro-imaging technology.  The following cases provide the clinician with useful tools to aid the care of neuro-optometric patients.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

CL-16
Jeffrey Sonsino, Muriel Schornack

Scleral Lenses: High Tech vs Low Tech Evaluation


Scleral lenses can be fit and evaluated using either advanced imaging technology or simple tools present in most offices.  One presenter uses the top technology available in the evaluation process.  The other relies on diagnostic lens fitting  and slit lamp.  Evaluation techniques are discussed in depth with examples, fitting tips, and images.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

BV-17
Angel Romero

Clinical Management of Adult Onset Diplopia: Five Cases


This course presents five clinical cases of sudden onset diplopia in adult patients: causes and management. A review on the disruption of sensory fusion, and management options for these patients is provided.
2 hours


Room 228

JP-01
Louis Schlesinger

An Overview of EMR's Buried, Hidden Data and How this Data Impacts Malpractice Litigation


Using a fictitious malpractice lawsuit, the attendee will gain insight into some of the issues that result in lawsuits, how lawsuits progress from depositions to trial, how EMRs will result in a drastic shift in the way alleged wrongdoing is investigated, and how they can minimize the chance that their EMRs will lose the case for them.
1 hour


Room 224 A

WK-17
Marc Taub, So Yeon Lee, Cynthia Heard, Anna Schlesselman

Incorporating Low Vision into Your Primary Care Practice

This workshop gives an overview of low vision rehabilitation and its services, reviews common conditions that cause visual impairment, demonstrates tests involved in low vision evaluation and introduces many optical, electronic and non-optical aids available to help patients achieve their visual goals.
3 hours


10:00 AM


North Ballroom B-C

NO-09
Larry Richardson

A Clinical Approach to Neuroanatomy and Neuro-optometry


This course reviews the more common neuro-ophthalmic disorders using the neuroanatomy to guide the discussion. The diagnosis and management of neuro-ophthalmic diseases are highlighted using case presentations, neuro-images, and videos of cases.  Neurologic disease of the visual pathway, the oculomotor system and the pupils are included.
2 hours CEE


North Ballroom D

PS-15
Mohammad Rafieetary

Retinal Angiography vs. Tomography


With the advances in retinal tomography, many eye care practitioners are questioning the need for the more invasive fluorescein angiography procedure. This lecture compares these different diagnostic techniques and evaluates the significance of each technique in clinical diagnosis of posterior segment disease.
2 hours


Room 221 A-C

GO-23
Kimberly Reed

Prevention of Medical Errors: A Root Cause Analysis Approach


Several states require that optometrists complete a course in the Prevention of Medical Errors. This two hour course examines the most frequent causes of medical errors, along with the various requirements for investigating those errors. A special emphasis on medication errors and the impact of electronic health records (EHR) is included.
2 hours


Room 222 A-C

SD-14
A. Paul Chous

Diabetes Disasters


This course reviews some common and not so common disasters pertaining to the care of patients with diabetes and the optometrist's role in preventing these dangerous situations.
1 hour


Room 227 A-C

LV-13
Susan Leat

Pediatric Low Vision Management: Making a Start


This course discusses the optometrist's role in the low vision habilitation of children with low vision, but without other impairments. The ways in which children with low vision differ from adults is described. The main interventions are considered according to age group; infants and pre-schoolers (0-5 year olds), 6-10 year olds and 11+ years.
2 hours


Room 228

PM-04
Dave Kading, Mile Brujic

Does Better Patient Care Translate To More Practice Profitability?


As eye care continues to evolve, advances in diagnostic testing, therapeutics and contact lenses continue to be the impetus for much of this change.  This course describes many new advances and how they are helping us better care for our patients with a special emphasis on properly implementing them to ensure practice profitability.
1 hour


11:00 AM


Room 121 A-C

SD-15
Todd Peabody, Richard Meetz

Moving the Bull's-Eye: An Update on Plaquenil & the Eye


This course discusses the use of anti-malarials such as Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine), their potential toxic effects on the eye, and the recommended screening protocols for patients taking Plaquenil. Included is the correct dosing of this medication and a cost/benefit analysis associated with accurate management of patients using Plaquenil.
1 hour


Room 122 A-C

PO-03
Rick Potvin

Presbyopia Correcting Intraocular Lenses


This course reviews the principles of accommodative and multifocal intraocular lenses currently available in the U.S. for the correction of presbyopia. Results reported in the FDA clinical trials and the peer-reviewed literature are also presented.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

AS-09
Milton Hom

Allergy, Dry Eye, or Both?


Allergies or dry eye? New research shows that up to 60% of patients have both. Learn new ways to simplify potentially confusing diagnosis. Topics include treatment algorithms, TOSS/OSDI scoring, the rhinitis connection, polypharmacy, and indoor environmental allergies.
1 hour


Room 226 A-C

JP-02
Robert Dister, Michael Harris

Do You Meet the Standard of Care for Optometry?


Eye care practitioners must meet the prevailing standard of care. In an interactive forum, we will discuss: What is the standard of care for Optometry? How is it determined?  Does the standard of care ever change? How can you tell if you meet the standard of care?
1 hour


12:30 PM


North Ballroom B-C

AS-10
Nicholas Colatrella, Jeffrey Varanelli

How to take the "Recurrent" out of Recurrent Corneal Erosion Syndrome.


This one hour lecture highlights several distinct cases of recurrent corneal erosion syndrome, each emphasizing separate, yet effective treatment options.   We discuss various treatment paradigms that benefit patients suffering from this condition, and present a stepwise approach to handle recalcitrant cases.
1 hour


North Ballroom D

PS-16
Sherrol Reynolds, Diana Shechtman

The Spectrum of Retinal Vascular Anomalies


Current understanding of anomalous retinal vessels may be challenging as these vessels may represent a spectrum of diseases. Understanding the pathophysiology is important in both diagnosis and management. This presentation discusses the evolution of CNV, variants such as PCV, RAP,  collateral vessels and primary retinal telangiectasia.
2 hours CEE


Room 122 A-C

OP-08
John Kaminski

Pharmacology Considerations For Your Patients Over 50


This course provides the eye care professional with an overview of the pharmacological aspects of managing older patients.  Practical tips for effective geriatric eye care are given.  Ocular side effects of common systemic medications are discussed.  Prescribing pearls for optometrists managing patients over 50 are provided.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

SD-17
Anthony DeWilde

Five Facts That Changed How I Manage Graves' Disease


Graves' disease is a complex autoimmune disease that can affect the eye. New research has changed our understanding of Graves' disease. This course translates the research into clinical practice. Through discussion of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and case examples, the clinician will be better able to manage patients with Graves' disease.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

GL-13
Brett King

The Search for Blebless Glaucoma Surgery


Bleb-related adverse events can be devastating. The management of trabeculectomy is complicated.  The ongoing search for a highly effective, low risk glaucoma surgery has produced interesting new procedures that reduce bleb-related concerns.  This course reviews the history of glaucoma surgery and the progress made in new and developing surgeries.
1 hour


Room 225 A-B

Lectures and Workshops Committee

Course Proposal Submitting Workshop

Attendees learn about critical tools for a successful Lectures & Workshops submission.
1 hour


1:30 PM


North Ballroom B-C

Jerome Sherman
Exploring the Globe with Technologies That Image a Mile Wide and a Mile Deep

Novel technologies lead to both early and new disease identification.  EDI OCT and Multi-Spectral Imaging reveal disorders at various depths otherwise invisible.  Panoramic auto-fluorescence reveals RPE defects not observable with BIO. This course highlights these and other technologies and the disorders that are uncovered, some for the first time.
2 hours


Room 122 A-C

OP-09
Len Hua

Drug Interactions Pertinent to Eyecare


Over two million serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occur yearly in the US costing thousands of lives. This course focuses on the potential drug interactions that may occur when eyecare providers prescribe medications in the clinical management of ocular problems. It also presents tips on how to prescribe judiciously to minimize ADRs.
1 hour


Room 221 A-C

OP-10
Arthur Epstein

Antibiotics, Optometry and the Coming Armageddon


In use since for less than a century, antibiotics have changed the way we live and how health care providers practice. This course explores current trends in infectious disease with focus on antibiotic therapy in eyecare. Discussion of potentially catastrophic trends in emerging antibiotic resistance and infection management will be explored.
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

GO-25
John Kaminski, Satya Verma

Baby Boomers Today and the Challenges Tomorrow: Taking Care Of Your Older Patients


This course provides the audience with an overview of current aging concepts and challenges relevant to the optometric practice.  Practical tips for effective geriatric eye care delivery are given.  Public policies and forces impacting geriatric eye care practice are reviewed.
2 hours


2:30 PM


North Ballroom D

CL-17
Langis Michaud

Controversies in Contact Lens Care


This lecture provides key elements to consider in order to evaluate c.l.care systems. A review of the actual scientific knowledge is made. New solutions are presented in comparison with older formulations. Analysis of the increased infiltrative events seen in the last year is made. Clinical recommendations are given to minimize such adverse events.
1 hour


Room 121 A-C

RS-02
Ryan Vida

Surgical Options for High Rx Patients


This course reviews the surgical options for patients with high prescriptions including the risks, benefits, and surgical techniques. Implantable Collamer Lens, Phakic Intraocular lens, and Refractive Lens Exchange are covered, as well as clinical tips for post-op management.
1 hour


Room 122 A-C

GL-14
Robert DiMartino

Anterior Chamber Angle Examination - A Stranger in a Strange Land


This presentation reviews the anterior chamber anatomy and the techniques and lens selection in performing gonioscopy.  Clinical examples are presented.
1 hour


3:30 PM


North Ballroom D

AS-12
Nicholas Colatrella, Jeffrey Varanelli
Chemical Injuries of the Cornea

Corneal chemical injuries often result in significant ocular morbidity and generally strike young adults in the prime of their life.  This lecture will present a classification scheme that will help enable the private practitioner to determine the severity of the injury and the prognosis of the inured eye.
1 hour


Room 121 A-C

SD-18
Tiffenie Harris
Primary Eye Care for the Hypertensive Patient:  Management of Hypertensive Crises

This course will review hypertension by providing a review of the literature as well as case examples illustrating clinical decision-making. Emphasis will be on the management of patients with severely elevated BP. Effective decision-making will help reduce over referrals to the emergency department,while providing appropriate patient care.
1 hour


Room 122 A-C

AS-13
Lynette Johns
Severe Ocular Surface Disease

Patients suffering with severe ocular surface disease are often primarily managed by corneal specialists and co-managed by optometrists.  We will discuss extreme cases of ocular surface disease, systemic conditions and their ocular surface manifestations, and treatment options for these complex conditions.      
1 hour


Room 222 A-C

AS-14
Etty Bitton
Red, Green or Yellow : Understanding ocular surface staining

Ophthalmic dyes are vital in the understanding the integrity of the anterior ocular surface. Staining of ocular surface tissue provides valuable insight in the evaluation of dry eye (DE) patients as well as contact lens (CL) candidates. This course describes when to use which topical dye and how to maximize their use in clinical practice.
1 hour


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