NIGHTTIME LIGHTING IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH MYOPIA

Title NIGHTTIME LIGHTING IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH MYOPIA
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, Brett Irvin, Lisa Jones, Robert Kleinstein, Ruth Manny, Julie Shin, Donald Mutti, The Study Group
Topic
Year
1999
Day
Monday
Program Number
3:20 pm
Room
Room 606-607
Affiliation
Ohio State University
Abstract PURPOSE. Recently, a strong association between myopia and nursery lighting at night was reported, with five times as many myopic children among those who slept with room lights on before age two compared to those who slept in the dark. The proportion of myopic children in the group who slept with a night light was intermediate between the proportions who slept with full room light or in darkness (Quinn et al., 1999). We sought to replicate these results.

METHODS. Parents of children enrolled in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study in the 1998-99 academic year were invited to complete a questionnaire about nighttime lighting for their child before the age of two and at present. Data on the child's refractive error as measured by cycloplegic autorefraction were analyzed.

RESULTS. Our sample of 1,148 children have a median age of 10.0 years. Overall, 15.9% of them are myopic (at least -0.75 D spherical equivalent). The proportion of children with myopia does not differ across the three lighting groups (chi-squared test, p = 0.22). Seventy-three of the 396 children (18.4%) who slept in darkness before age two are myopic; 103 of the 712 children (14.5%) who slept with a night light before age two are myopic, and 7 of the 40 children (17.5%) who slept with full room lights on before age two are myopic. There is no effect of ethnicity on this relation. This sample provides a statistical power of 0.99 to be able to detect an odds ratio of 2.00.

CONCLUSION. We do not find that there is any association between nighttime nursery lighting and myopia in a representative sample of school-aged children and believe that parents should not concern themselves with this unfounded risk. Supported by NIH-NEI grants U10-EY08893, R21-EY12273, and T35-EY-07151.
Affiliation of Co-Authors Ohio State University, University of Alabama, University of Houston, Southern California College of Optometry, Ohio State University, Ohio State University
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