NOVEL DEPTH ILLUSIONS INVOLVING CHROMOSTEREOPSIS: CLUES OF WHY WE SOMETIMES SEE DEPTH AND SOMETIMES NOT

Title NOVEL DEPTH ILLUSIONS INVOLVING CHROMOSTEREOPSIS: CLUES OF WHY WE SOMETIMES SEE DEPTH AND SOMETIMES NOT
Author, Co-Author Jocelyn Faubert
Topic
Year
1992
Day
Monday
Program Number
Poster 41
Room
Great Hall
Affiliation
Abstract The depth perception sometimes observed when viewing coloured stimuli has been of interest for many years. The most striking example of depth perception induced by coloured stimuli is represented by chromostereopsis. This is when two coloured stimuli, such as red and blue, shown within a two-dimensional image, are actually perceived as being on different depth planes. Present models explaining chromostereopsis are essentially based on optical properties of the eye. It is generally beleived that retinal disparities between the two eyes produced by transverse chromatic abberations, with possible interactions of pupil decentralisation and Styles-Crawford effect, are responsible for the binocular depth perception observed in chromostereopsis. I will show stimuli where the depth relations cannot be explained on the basis of optical properties alone. These depth illusions will show spatially adjacent colours such as red and green seen on the same depth plane while the same green in different spatial locations will be perceived on different depth planes, all within the same image. Results from studies show that this effect is spatially tuned and that depth is only visible when a sepparate depth plane is available to the brain.
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline