PREDICTION OF JUVENILE MYOPIA ONSET

Title PREDICTION OF JUVENILE MYOPIA ONSET
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, Lisa A. Jones, G. Lynn Mitchell, Donald O. Mutti
Topic
Year
2002
Day
Friday
Program Number
Room
Room 1 SP
Affiliation
Abstract PURPOSE: To identify reliable predictors of the onset of juvenile myopia as a function of parental history of myopia and child’s near work.

METHODS: Data from 1142 children enrolled in the Orinda Longitudinal Study of Myopia (OLSM) as non-myopes with baseline data from the third grade were evaluated to develop a predictive profile for later onset of juvenile myopia. Myopia was defined as at least-0.75 D of myopia in the vertical and horizontal meridians (OD) as measured by cycloplegic autorefraction (n=109 myopes with onset between grades 4 and 8, inclusive). Chosen predictors were parental history of myopia, near work, refractive error and the following ocular components: corneal power, Gullstrand crystalline lens power, axial length.

RESULTS: Univariate proportional hazards models assessed the relation between near work or parental history of myopia with the child’s myopia onset. In these models, reading hours (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.05, p=0.0210), sports hours (HR=0.95, p=0.0030) and number of myopic parents (one myopic parent HR=2.62, two parents HR=4.33, p=0.0089 and p<0.0001, respectively) were significantly associated with myopia onset. Consistent with our previous work, spherical cycloplegic autorefraction was the best, single predictor. Controlling for spherical refractive error, only the number of hours spent playing sports per week was significantly associated with myopia onset (HR=0.95, p=0.0046). In a model including the spherical refractive error, axial length, and corneal power, sports maintained this association (HR=0.94, p=0.0007).

CONCLUSIONS: More hours spent in sports activities per week was significantly associated with myopia onset in a protective way, even after the addition of previously determined predictors (spherical cycloplegic autorefraction, axial length and corneal power). The addition of parental history of myopia or near work did not add to these factors in predicting the onset of myopia.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Supported by NIH/NEI grants U10-EY08893 and R21-EY12273, the Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation, and the EF Wildermuth Foundation.
Affiliation of Co-Authors The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry
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