READING ADDITIONS IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH LOW VISION - EFFECTS ON READING PERFORMANCE

Title READING ADDITIONS IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH LOW VISION - EFFECTS ON READING PERFORMANCE
Author, Co-Author Balsam Alabdulkader, Susan Leat
Topic
Year
2011
Day
Thursday
Program Number
110521
Room
Room 210
Affiliation
Abstract PURPOSE: Children and young adults with low vision often have reduced accommodative response for their age which can be corrected with a reading addition. The purpose of this study is to investigate three methods of determining a reading. addition and which method results in better reading performance

METHODS: Thirty participants with low vision took part, aged 8 to 35 years with visual acuity between 20/46 and 20/300. Reading additions were determined with modified Nott dynamic retinoscopy, a subjective method and an age-based formula. Reading performance was assessed with MNREAD-style charts at 12.5cm with and without each reading addition in random order. Reading speed was plotted against print size and the maximum reading speed, critical print size, reading acuity threshold and the area under the reading speed curve were determined. A questionnaire was administered to determine patterns of daily reading.

RESULTS: For the participants who had abnormal accommodation, the area under the reading speed curve was significantly greater with the subjective addition compared to no addition (p=0.048) and the reading acuity threshold was significantly better with the age add compared to no add (p=0.012). Analysis of individual performances showed that some subjects demonstrated clear improvement of reading performance with a reading add, while others showed little change. Of those participants who showed an improvement, all but one participant had abnormal accommodation. Spearman correlation showed that the time spent reading each day correlated with the area under the reading speed curve (p=0.0024). Perceived difficulty of reading correlated with near visual acuity (p=0.0009), MNREAD threshold (p=0.02) and maximum reading speed (p=0.014).

CONCLUSIONS: A reading addition should be considered in a low vision assessment, particularly when accommodation is reduced. A reading addition based on age could be used as a starting point, refined by the subjective method to give optimal reading performance.
Affiliation of Co-Authors University of Waterloo, School of Optometry and Vision Science
Outline