Reading Performance with and without Optical Low Vision Devices in AMD

Title Reading Performance with and without Optical Low Vision Devices in AMD
Author, Co-Author Marissa Locy, Liyan Gao, Gerald McGwin, Cynthia Owsley, Dawn DeCarlo
Topic Low Vision
Year
2016
Day
Thursday
Program Number
165142
Room
Ballroom A-B
Affiliation
Abstract

Purpose. To compare reading performance, including the Reading Accessibility Index (ACC), with and without prescribed optical low vision devices in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The ACC is defined as the mean reading speed across the 10 largest print sizes (8M to 1M) on the MNREAD acuity chart. The ACC represents an individual’s access to the range of print sizes commonly found in everyday activities.

Methods. Participants (n=199) with AMD were evaluated to determine best-corrected visual acuity and reading performance using the MNREAD chart (Precision Vision). Those that were prescribed optical low vision devices were tested with a different version of the MNREAD chart with each prescribed device, beginning at the 2M print (0.7 logMAR @ 40cm). For the ACC, since there was no reading speed data using devices for print larger than 2M the data was analyzed as if they were the same as for 2M print per the instructions of the ACC. Critical Print Size (CPS) - the smallest print size that supports reading near the maximum reading rate and reading acuity (RA) – the smallest print read were also determined.

Results. The study consisted of 162 patients with AMD for whom optical low vision devices were prescribed. Their mean age in years was 82.6 ± 7.5, 160 (99%) were white, and 110 (67.9%) were female. When using a prescribed optical low vision device, the ACC (0.6 ± 0.3), CPS (0.2 ± 0.2), and RA (0.03 ± 0.2) were significantly improved (p< 0.05) vs. using the patient's habitual prescription (ACC 0.5 ± 0.3, CPS 0.7 ± 0.3, RA 0.5 ± 0.3). The MRS was not significantly improved.

Conclusions. Patients with AMD have significantly improved reading capabilities when provided an optical low vision device. Using the device on average enabled participants to easily access print smaller than newsprint by improving CPS and RA. The ACC is improved less, as it only pertains to print 1M in size or larger.

 

Affiliation of Co-Authors UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Center for Low Vision Rehabilitation
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