SIMULATOR DRIVING WITH HEMIANOPIA: DETECTION OF STATIC AND MOVING PEDESTRIANS

Title SIMULATOR DRIVING WITH HEMIANOPIA: DETECTION OF STATIC AND MOVING PEDESTRIANS
Author, Co-Author Concetta Alberti, P. Matthew Bronstad, Amanda Albu, Alex Hwang, Robert Goldstein, Eli Peli, Alex Bowers
Topic
Year
2011
Day
Program Number
115985
Room
Amphitheater
Affiliation
Abstract PURPOSE: Hemianopia may impair detection of objects in the blind hemifield when driving. In our previous simulator study (Bowers et al., 2009) we reported large detection deficits for stationary pedestrians that appeared at the roadside in the blind hemifield. However, the eccentricity of the pedestrian with respect to the car heading increased rapidly as the car approached, thus moving the hazard further into the blind hemifield, which may have contributed to the low detection rates. Using a more realistic hazard, we are now evaluating detection of pedestrians that move (walk/run) on a collision course toward the car’s heading direction. We predict that blindside detection rates will be higher for moving pedestrians (maintaining an approximately constant eccentricity with respect to the car) than for static pedestrians, especially at larger eccentricities.

METHODS: To date, 2 persons with complete hemianopia have performed the pedestrian detection task while driving along pre-determined routes in two driving simulator sessions. Pedestrian figures appeared in a variety of potentially hazardous situations either on the right or left at small (about 4°) or large (about 14°) eccentricities with respect to the car heading. Static pedestrians (n = 60) were presented in one session and moving pedestrians (n = 60) were presented in the other session, in counterbalanced order.

RESULTS: Blindside detection rates were 67% for moving and 26% for static pedestrians at the large eccentricity (p = 0.01), compared to 87% and 72%, respectively, at the small eccentricity (p = 0.14; data collapsed across both participants as they showed similar patterns). Seeing side detection rates were 100% at both eccentricities for both pedestrian types.

CONCLUSIONS: Even in a realistic hazard detection task with life-size pedestrian figures moving on a collision course, our preliminary findings suggest that drivers with hemianopia have significant blindside detection deficits, especially for hazards at larger eccentricities.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Funded in part by NIH grants EY12890 (EP) and EY018680 (ARB)
Affiliation of Co-Authors Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute
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