VISUAL ACTIVITIES AND PROGRESSION OF JUVENILE-ONSET MYOPIA

Title VISUAL ACTIVITIES AND PROGRESSION OF JUVENILE-ONSET MYOPIA
Author, Co-Author Karla Zadnik, Loraine Sinnott, Lisa Jones, Donald Mutti, CLEERE Study Group
Topic
Year
2007
Day
Friday
Program Number
070046
Room
Room 5/6
Affiliation
The Ohio State University, College of Optometry
Abstract PURPOSE: To assess associations between weekly hours spent in sports/outdoor activities and reading activities and the progression of juvenile-onset myopia in children enrolled in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study.

METHODS: CLEERE children who were eligible for this analysis included incident myopes with data on weekly sports/outdoor and reading hours available after their myopia onset. The annual change in refractive error for each visit was calculated and regressed on sports, reading, gender, ethnicity, age, and an interaction term for activity and gender. Both sports and reading hours were modeled in a variety of ways. Specifically, variables for each were created for the weekly hours before and after an annual period, the average of an annual period, and as a function of the ranked quartile in which a child fell.

RESULTS: Six hundred forty children were included. The only statistically significant sports/outdoor activities effect in the multiple regression models was an association between the average annual weekly sports hours and the annual myopic progression in girls (beta = -0.0084; p<0.05). Specifically, for every 10 hours more weekly sports a girl's parent reported, there was an associated 0.06-D decrease in her annual myopic progression. For weekly reading hours, there was a statistically significant effect for boys in terms of both the continuous and quartile-level variables, on the order of a 0.14-D increase in myopic progression for every 10 reading hours.

CONCLUSIONS: Although the reported associations between either weekly sports/outdoor or reading hours and annual myopic progression are statistically significant, they are neither robust across different measures of the sports and reading variables nor clinically significant in terms of their magnitude.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Supported by the NEI/NIH grants U10-EY08893 and R24-EY014792, the Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation and the EF Wildermuth Foundation.
Affiliation of Co-Authors The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, College of Optometry
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