A VISUAL SURVEY OF SCHOOL CHILDREN IN HONG KONG

Title A VISUAL SURVEY OF SCHOOL CHILDREN IN HONG KONG
Author, Co-Author Winnie S.H.Goh, Carly S.Y.Lam, Bsc(Hons)
Topic
Year
1992
Day
Sunday
Program Number
Poster 72
Room
Great Hall
Affiliation
Abstract Myopia is the major refractive anomaly among Hong Kong Chinese school children. The aims of this survey were to study some possible influences on the cause of myopia and to establish guidelines to strengthen the vision health care for the school children. 1258 school children aged from six to 19 were surveyed and screened. Cannon R-22 auto-refractor was used to assess the objective refractive errors. A range from -0.75 to +1.25 dioptre spherical equivalent was chosen as the criteria for 'PASS'. Any refractive errors beyond this range was considered 'FAIL'. Spectacles wearers with relative refractive errors (i.e. the difference between auto-refraction and spectacle prescription) falling outside this range were regarded as 'FAIL'. The questionnaire was filled in by their parents one week prior to the screening. Results showed that the degree of myopia increased with age generally, with a significant increment at age nine to 10 for girls and at age 14 to 15 for boys. Major findings of this study were that 58 per cent of the school children failed the screening test according to our criteria. The failure rate was highest between the age of 10 to 12. Among the 'FAIL' group, 40 per cent of the subjects had never had any eye test before. Mean hours of close work after school averaged four and a half hours per day which peaked at age 10 to 11. Of those school children whose spherical equivalent were -1.00DS or more, 50 per cent have either their parents were myopic for girls, and 43 per cent for boys. Analysis of the data showed that genetic influence might play a role on the cause of myopia. Reading and long hours of close work are among the risk factors which cause the development of myopia. The high failure rate from the screening definitely revealed the need to improve the present vision health care system which only provides one screening at the entry to primary school for school children. An improved screening programme is suggested.
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline