WHEN TREATMENT FAILS: NEOVASCULARIZATION OF THE IRIS INDUCING AN ANTERIOR CHAMBER REACTION

Title WHEN TREATMENT FAILS: NEOVASCULARIZATION OF THE IRIS INDUCING AN ANTERIOR CHAMBER REACTION
Author, Co-Author Jeffrey Roth, Pamela Hooker, Jerome Sherman
Topic
Year
2003
Day
Sunday
Program Number
Room
Affiliation
State University of New York, College of Optometry
Abstract BACKGROUND: Several entities can cause anterior chamber reactions in adult patients. Etiologies range from inflammation secondary to trauma or collagen vascular disease, to those that are idiopathic. One Causative factor that must be considered when confronted with a systemic history of diabetes mellitus, is whether or not the patient has been diagnosed with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

CASE REPORT(S): MS, a 76 year-old middle-eastern female, presented to the Eye Clinic at Woodhull Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y. on July 2, 2003. During the case history, she stated she was being treated with Pred Forte and an antibiotic cover in her left eye over the last two months for an unresponsive inflammation. She was positive for diabetes mellitus for 16 years, with blood sugars ranging from 116 to over 400, and her most recent reading was 316. Upon careful iris evaluation, it was discovered that MS had neovascularization of the iris OU. Gonioscopy revealed one clock hour of neovascularization in the angle of the left eye. Dilation was performed at this visit and showed a C/D ratio of .3 OU with a distinct optic nerve head and no neovascularization of the disk. Cotton-wool-spots and hemorrhages were found in every quadrant, as was neovascularization elsewhere in the left eye. A similar, well-documented case, will also be provided.

CONCLUSIONS: Anterior chamber reactions can be caused by various ocular entities. It is vital to consider not only a patient’s immediate history, including possible traumas or systemic inflammations, but also all underlying systemic conditions. This poster will review causes of anterior chamber reactions and will discuss how such reactions can be caused by poorly controlled diabetes. It will serve to help other practitioners in managing similar cases.
Affiliation of Co-Authors State University of New York, College of Optometry, State University of New York, College of Optometry
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