WHICH HABITUAL SYMPTOM QUESTIONS ON THE DRY EYE QUESTIONNAIRE BEST DISCRIMINATE PATIENTS WITH TEAR DEFICIENT DRY EYE FROM CONTROLS?

Title WHICH HABITUAL SYMPTOM QUESTIONS ON THE DRY EYE QUESTIONNAIRE BEST DISCRIMINATE PATIENTS WITH TEAR DEFICIENT DRY EYE FROM CONTROLS?
Author, Co-Author Robin Chalmers, Barbara Caffery, Carolyn Begley
Topic
Year
2001
Day
Sunday
Program Number
2:00 pm
Room
Room 114
Affiliation
2097 East Lake Rd
Abstract PURPOSE. To demonstrate which symptoms on the Dry Eye Questionnaire (DEQ) are most useful to discriminate among patients with varying degree of dry eye and from normal controls.

METHOD. 100 patients with tear deficient dry eye from Toronto Western Hospital were invited by mail to complete the DEQ and the McMonnies’ questionnaire (MQ). 62 patients responded, 30 with Sjogren’s Syndrome (SS) and 32 with non-Sjogren’s dry eye (KCS). Age and gender matched controls without dry eye diagnoses were selected from an historical data set. The DEQ measures the habitual frequency and intensity across time of day for symptoms of: discomfort, dryness, blurry vision, soreness, grittiness, burning, photophobia and itching.

RESULTS. The frequency and intensity of dryness, discomfort and burning were best to discriminate dry eye patients from controls and between dry eye diagnoses; photophobia was the least useful symptom. On the DEQ "frequent to constant" dryness was reported by 86% of SS, 57% of KCS and 16% of controls; discomfort by 83% of SS, 55% of KCS and 20% of controls, and burning by 68% of SS, 41% of KCS and 4% of controls. With the MQ’s global frequency question, 88% of SS, 67% of KCS and 6% of controls reported having symptoms "often to constantly", while the range reporting "frequent to constant" individual symptoms on the DEQ was 59-86% for SS, 38-57% for KCS and 4-16% for controls.

CONCLUSIONS. Dryness, discomfort and burning were the most useful and photophobia was the least useful symptom to screen patients for dry eye disease. Compared to the DEQ, the MQ may over-estimate the frequency of symptoms among SS and KCS patients and under-estimate it for control patients.
Affiliation of Co-Authors Indiana University
Outline