YELLOW TINTED CONTACT LENSES PROVIDE RELIEF FROM THE OPTOMETRY STUDENT’S EXPERIENCE AS A PRACTICE "PATIENT"

Title YELLOW TINTED CONTACT LENSES PROVIDE RELIEF FROM THE OPTOMETRY STUDENT’S EXPERIENCE AS A PRACTICE "PATIENT"
Author, Co-Author John Hayes, David Glabe, Len Hua, James Sheedy
Topic
Year
2010
Day
Friday
Program Number
105370
Room
Third Floor Foyer
Affiliation
Pacific University, College of Optometry
Abstract PURPOSE: Optometry students sit for hours as practice patients for their colleagues. The purposes of this study was to determine if wearing a yellow contact lens would provide comfort and not interfere with the "doctor" training.

METHODS: 35 2nd year optometry students wore a yellow tinted contact lens on one randomly assigned eye. The lenses had either an 8.7 or 8.5 base curve with -0.25 or -0.50 power. The lenses were kept in each subject’s own folder with a log sheet to record light exposure in each eye. The study period lasted approximately 4 months. During that time students learned BIO and high plus technique in 3-4 hour weekly labs plus practice outside of class. Percent responses to a questionnaire at the end of the semester regarding their experience are reported. For 5 point scales, the combined positive response with a 4 or 5 is reported with the 4th point identified.

RESULTS: Filters are usually comfortable to wear (56%); offer quite a bit of comfort from bright light(37%); were usually worn(95%); usually exposure was accurately logged (100%); "doctor" usually increased intensity of light on filtered eye(17%); more exposure in unfiltered eye(51%), filtered eye (6%), no difference (43%); as a "doctor" preferred unfiltered eye (40%), filtered eye(8.6%), no difference or preference(51%); recommend the yellow filter(45%); plan to usually use for patients in future practice(28%); like to use next year as practice patient(57%); would pay

CONCLUSIONS: Previous research suggests low wave length energy is the source of discomfort glare. Reducing this source of discomfort requires a compromise between reducing transmission for comfort, but not so much as to make the examination difficult to conduct. Our results indicated an acceptance of the filters by many, but there is still an opportunity to discover the characteristics of an optimal filter.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Sponsored by Macular Degeneration Foundation
Affiliation of Co-Authors
Outline