THE EFFECT OF TROPICAMIDE VERSUS CYCLOPENTOLATE CYCLOPLEGIA ON THE MEASUREMENT OF REFRACTIVE ERROR AND CRYSTALLINE LENS POWER AND THICKNESS

Lisa Kish

Abstract

Cyclopentolate is the pediatric cycloplegic agent of choice, yet it is known to have psychogenic side effects in up to 23% of children (Binkhorst et al., 1968). In addition, it produces cycloplegia and mydriasis of prolonged duration that can affect follow-up rates in longitudinal studies. Tropicamide is free of systemic side effects but has been more widely utilized as a mydriatic drug. Past studies have focused on the differences in the amplitude of residual accommodation produced by the two drugs. To our knowledge, no study has compared these two agents by measuring refractive error or crystalline lens parameters. We measured refractive error (Canon R-1 autorefraction), crystalline lens power (video-ophthalmophakometry), and lens thickness (A-scan ultrasonography) in 20 non-strabismic hyperopes (age range = 6 to 12 years, refractive error range = +0.25 to +4.50 D) with tropicamide and cyclopentolate. The average differences in refractive error and lens power between cyclopentolate 60 minutes after instillation and tropicamide 30 minutes after instillation were 0.20 +/- 0.30 D and 0.65 +/- 0.69 D respectively, with cyclopentolate resulting in more hyperopia and higher lens power. Lens thickness differences were -0.03 +/- 0.05 mm (thinner with cyclopentolate). All of these differences are statistically significant (paired t-test, pPOSTERIOR STROMAL CORNEAL INFLAMMATION MASQUERADING AS CORNEAL DYSTROPHY

Details

Year: 1992

Program Number: 1:45 pm

Author Affiliation: n/a

Co-Authors: Sherri Egashira, J. Twelker, Donald Mutti, Karla Zadnik, Anthony Adams

Co-Author Affiliation: n/a

Room: Scotland A