A NEW AND OBJECTIVE VISUAL FEEDBACK OCULAR MOTOR TRAINING SYSTEM

Daniella Rutner

Abstract

PURPOSE. To determine if oculomotor visual feedback can be conceptualized and used by young children (5-10 years of age) to improve their eye movements. METHOD. Five visually-normal children and one nystagmat were tested. Horizontal eye movements in the right eye were monitored objectively. The eye movements controlled a small (8H X 11 V degree) video image of a storyteller on an otherwise large TV screen. Children were instructed to reduce their fixational eye movements within a pre-selected criterion (+/-1.75-3.5 degrees). If they did, the video and audio aspect remained; if they did not, the video aspect was extinguished until accurate fixation was regained.

RESULTS. All children understood the instructions and were successful in controlling their eye movements at least 90% of the time after 1 training session. The nystagmat subject was able to reduce his nystagmus in both frequency and amplitude.

CONCLUSIONS. Such oculomotor-based visual feedback training appears to be a viable alternative to oculomotor auditory feedback and other conceptually complicated techniques in young children with oculomotor dysfunction. Moreover, young children have plastic visual systems and as such are amendable to change.

Details

Year: 2001

Program Number: Poster 31

Author Affiliation: State University of New York

Co-Authors: Kenneth Ciuffreda

Co-Author Affiliation: State University of New York

Room: Exhibit Hall C