TRACKING EYE MOVEMENTS DURING LASIK: ASSESSING THE RESULTS OF LASIK WITH AND WITHOUT THE VISX STAR S3 ACTIVETRAK EYETRACKER

Tina Wachter

Abstract

PURPOSE. To compare the outcomes of myopic and astigmatic eyes undergoing LASIK with the VISX STAR S3 ActiveTrak Eyetracker compared to those undergoing LASIK without the eyetracker. METHOD. This prospective evaluation treated a total of 338 myopic astigmatic eyes with LASIK using the VISX STAR S3. The evaluation compared the results of 229 eyes treated with the eye tracker engaged to the results of 109 eye treated with the eye tracker not engaged.

RESULTS. At one month post-op 91% of the tracked group had a spherical equivalent refractive error between +/- 1 D. In the untracked group 97% had a spherical equivalent refractive error between +/- 1 D (p>0.05). At one month post-op 85% of the tracked group had a spherical equivalent refractive error between +/- 0.5 D. In the untracked group 87% had a spherical equivalent refractive error between +/- 0.5 D (p>0.05). In the tracked group, 67% of the eyes were 20/20 or better without correction at one month, and 87% were 20/25 or better without correction. In the untracked group, 59% of the eyes were 20/20 or better without correction at one month, and 80% were 20/25 or better without correction (p>0.05).

CONCLUSIONS. There was a statistically significant difference in the results of those patients treated with the eyetracker engaged compared to those treated without the eyetracker only in those eyes with preoperative spherical equivalents between-4.01 and-6.00. In all other groups of patients there was no statistical difference in the results of the groups treated with and without the tracker. In those cases where the tracker was used, the surgeons reported that the tracker was easy to engage and use. Patients with nystagmus, extreme correction, and excessive saccadic eye movement due to anxiety were treated, and are described in this report. In these and other unusual cases with a large amount of eye movement, the tracker may be beneficial in creating more regular ablation patterns. Optometrists need to be aware of the benefits of the eyetracker in some patients in order to effectively counsel those patients choosing LASIK.

Details

Year: 2001

Program Number: Poster 145

Author Affiliation: Minnesota Eye Consultants, P.A.

Co-Authors: Marlane Brown, David Hardten, Richard Lindstrom, Elizabeth Davis, Thomas Samuelson

Co-Author Affiliation: Minnesota Eye Consultants, P.A., Minnesota Eye Consultants, P.A., Minnesota Eye Consultants, P.A., Minnesota Eye Consultants, P.A., Minnesota Eye Consultants, P.A.

Room: Poster 145